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The Healing Powers of Moringa

Jun 01, 16
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congo moringaIn a remote valley of Congo, on a farm with splendid views of lush green mountains, I stand amidst a plantation of young moringa trees. The green leaves glisten in the African sun, the seed pods hang in curls. I pull a tender young leaf and chew on it, enjoying the fresh, pleasing taste. The Belgian couple growing this crop plans to cash in on an up-and-coming trend and their timing appears to be just right.

Over the past few years, a botanical new to the U.S. and European markets has been making impressive gains in popularity, due to its broad traditional benefits and emerging supportive science. That plant, moringa oleifera, is native to northern India, Pakistan, the Himalayan region, Africa and Arabia, but is now cultivated more widely throughout the tropics. The young plantation I have visited in Congo is one such cultivation project.

Also known as drumstick tree or horseradish tree, moringa trees grow quickly, reaching a height of between 15 and 30 feet within just a few years. The leaves, fruit flowers and immature pods of the tree are eaten as nutritious foods. The leaves in particular are consumed either raw in salads, tossed into blender drinks, or steamed like spinach. Rich in protein, beta-carotene, vitamin C, potassium and calcium, the leaves make an excellent green vegetable, and are pleasing in flavor.

But beyond the flavor and nutrition, moringa offers healing benefits. Virtually all parts of the plant are used to treat inflammation, infectious disorders, and various problems of the cardiovascular and digestive organs, while improving liver function and enhancing milk flow in nursing mothers. The uses of moringa are well documented in both the Ayurvedic and Unani systems of traditional medicine, among the most ancient healing systems in the world.

Moringa is rich in a variety of health-enhancing compounds, including moringine, moringinine, the potent antioxidants quercetin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, and various polyphenols. The leaves seem to be getting the most market attention, notably for their use in reducing high blood pressure, eliminating water weight, and lowering cholesterol.

Studies show that moringa leaves possess anti-tumor and anti-cancer activities, due in part to a compound called niaziminin. Preliminary experimentation also shows activity against the Epstein-Barr virus. Compounds in the leaf appear to help regulate thyroid function, especially in cases of over-active thyroid. Further research points to anti-viral activity in cases of Herpes simplex 1.

Now that moringa is emerging as a popular supplement for health enhancement, the science on this plant is accelerating. The glucose-modifying, anti-diabetic effects of moringa may prove of great use amidst a virtual epidemic of Type 2 diabetes and obesity. The liver-protective activities of the leaf and its extracts could make it a staple component of bitters formulas and various cleansing preparations. And ongoing work on the anti-cancer properties of moringa may at some point earn this plant a role in chemotherapy.

In the traditional medicinal systems of many cultures, plants with long uses and benefits remain to be discovered. Moringa oleifera, unknown in the market just ten years ago, is surging into greater popularity due to its multiple health benefits and nutritious value as a food. Also known colloquially as “miracle tree,” moringa is a valuable plant medicine, and deserves a place in the home pharmacy.

Article by Chris Kilham on March 29, 2016

Related News Article:  Moringa Leaves Saving Lives in DRC

trees for life.org - Moringa Tree Combats Malnutrition Worldwide

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Moringa Tree Combats Malnutrition Worldwide

Jun 01, 16
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 Moringa-1a

Moringa Trees can be found in the tropics, world wide. It also thrives in the arid parts of the world where bad water, poor diet, and the diseases are leading killers. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that nearly 80% of the world’s population relies on traditional medicine (the use of plants) for their primary healthcare. Since the Moringa Tree is already common in much of the developing world, it can meet the needs of local populations in terms of availability, accessibility, and utilization. It is already growing in areas of need, with spontaneous growth in many regions, and is a hearty and drought tolerant plant. Unlike imported medicine, foods, or other supplements, the low cost of the Moringa Tree makes it affordable to poor populations. Its potential as a cheap local supplement in the fight against malnutrition is promising. Many humanitarian organizations including the Church World Service, the Educational Concerns for Hunger Organizations, Trees for Life, and the National Science Foundation now promote the use of Moringa in poverty-stricken areas to combat malnutrition.

Amadou Ba, director of a Senegalese village health post states, “We were all trained in the classic solutions for treating malnutrition– whole milk powder, sugar, vegetable oil, sometimes peanut butter. But these ingredients are expensive and the recovery of malnourished infants can take months. Now we have replaced this with Moringa. We start seeing improvements within 10 days.”

Combats Childhood Blindness

Lack of vitamin A (due to malnutrition) causes 70% of childhood blindness around the world. 500,000 children are going blind every year due to lack of vitamin A. The Bethesda, Maryland based International Eye Foundation, is using Moringa with its high content of beta carotene, which is converted to vitamin A by the body, to combat childhood blindness around the world.

Purifies Water

Lack of drinkable water is one of the world’s most serious threats. Water related diseases account for more than 80% of the world’s sickness. People in many developing nations simply do not have acess to clean safe water. They are left with no choice but to drink and wash with water so contaminated that we wouldn’t even dare to walk in it.

Professor Suleyman Aremu Muyibi, of the International Islamic University of Malaysia, believes Moringa seeds could potentially provide a renewable, sustainable and biodegradable material for treating global water supplies. When Moringa seeds are crushed and added to dirty, bacteria laden water, they purify the water. As part of a Nigeria-based study, Muyibi feels that such an opportunity could be especially attractive in developing countries, where roughly 1.2 billion people still lack safe drinking water, with an estimated 25,000 people dying from water-borne diseases every day.

Britain’s University of Leicester is also studying the coagulating properties of Moringa seeds for its water purifying abilities. Researchers believe the Moringa seeds would work better than the common water purifier, aluminum sulfate, which can be toxic, and have successfully replaced the imported alum system of a Malawi village with a simpler full scale system using Moringa seeds.

Related News Article:  Moringa Leaves Saving Lives in DRC

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Moringa Recipes – 101 plus ways to eat and cook

May 06, 16
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Almost all the entire moringa tree can be eaten. You can eat the Moringa leaves, flowers, pods and even the Moringa seeds(dont eat too many seeds)

Moringa Juice

Mix moringa in a juice, milkshake. Honey works well to mask the taste.

Add only half a teaspoon of Moringa to juice to prevent spoiling the taste.

Moringa Salad

Sprinkle your Moringa over wet salad – you wont notice it.

Moringa in Cooked Meals

Sprinkle Moringa powder over the food just before serving. You can stir it in, but DON’T COOK Moringa powder, it diminishes the nutritional value.

Moringa Tea

You can add Moringa powder to hot water to create a tea. Do not boil the Moringa, add it to a pot with pre-boiled water an let it brew fro 3-5 minutes. Moringa tea has less nutrients than taking the powder.

How to cook and eat Moringa

There is endless ways to incorporate Moringa fresh leaves and Moringa  leaf powder into the diet.

Moringa leaf powder can be used as a tea, added to beverages, sprinkled on food or taken in capsules. Moringa leaf powder can be used in cooking or salades.

Moringa Recipes

moringa recipes

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MORINGA LEAVES GULAY*
Ingredients:
1 c. coconut milk diluted with 1 c. water
1 c. dried fish (boiled, flaked, and fried in 1 T. cooking fat)
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 medium onion, sliced
Moringa Recipes Page 5
1/8 tsp. salt
6 c. moringa leaves, washed and sorted
4 pieces chili peppers, crushed
Preparation: Boil coconut milk, dried fish, garlic and onion for 10 minutes. Season with salt, stirring the
mixture continuously. Add moringa leaves and crushed chili peppers. Cook 5 minutes longer. Serve hot.
Serves 6

.DRUMSTICK CURRY WITH ONIONS

Ingredients
» 2-3 onions finely chopped
» 1 tbsp tamarind extract or
» 1 tomato chopped
» 1 twig of curry leaves
» salt to taste
Seasoning
» 1/2 tsp mustard seeds
» 2 red chilis broken into pieces
» 2 tbsp cooking oil

Preparations

Cut drumsticks into 1″-11/2″ long pieces. Heat oil in a pan and add the seasoning ingredients. When mustard seeds stop spluttering, put the chopped vegetables except tomato and saute’. Add salt and turmeric powder. Cover the pan and allow it to cook on a low flame. Keep stirring in between till done. Add chili powder and tamarind extract / chopped tomato. Cook for some more time. Serve hot with rice.

DRUMSTICK WITH RICE AND COCONUT (Mulaga kaada Pindi koora)

Ingredients
» 4 or 5 drumsticks
» ½ cup rice soaked for 4 hrs
» ½ coconut
» 4 red chilies
» salt to taste
Seasoning
» 1 tsp black gram
» ½ tsp mustard seeds
» 1 red chili broken into bits
» 1 or 2 twigs of curry leaves
» ½ tbsp oil

Preparations

Wash and soak rice in just enough water. Grate coconut and grind it into not too fine a paste along with the red chilies and the soaked rice. Add salt and turmeric powder and dilute it by adding two to three cups of water. Cut drumsticks into 4 inch long pieces and cook them with a pinch of salt. Remove when done. Heat oil in a pan and add black gram, mustard seeds and chili pieces. When mustard stops crackling, put in the curry leaves and the liquid. Allow it to cook on a low flame, stirring all the time. Make sure that no lumps are formed. When done (check to see that the ground rice is cooked), add the cooked drumsticks and mix carefully so as not to mash the drumsticks. It goes well with rice.

Note: The contents should be well cooked. Test by tasting. Add more water if necessary and cook till properly done

Drumsticks cutlets

Ingredients
» 10-12 large fleshy drumsticks, unpeeled, cut into 3″ fingers
» 1 cup roasted gram, whole
» 5 slices bread crumbled coarsely
» 1/2 cup fine bread crumbs for coating
» 3-4 flakes garlic, grated
» 1″ piece ginger, grated
» 3-4 green chillies finely minced
» 1 large onion, coarsely grated, sprinkle with a little salt
» 1 tbsp. coriander leaves finely chopped
» 1/2 tsp. garam masala powder
» salt to taste
» oil for deep frying

PreparationsBoil drumsticks in plenty of water. Remove.
Scrape out inside flesh carefully, with a blunt knife, or back of a spoon.
Cool, run in a mixie till smooth.
Toast whole gram lightly on griddle till light golden.
Powder gram in mixie till fine, keep aside.
Press out all excess water from salted onions.
Heat one tbsp. oil
Add grated garlic, ginger, chillies, onions.
Stir till onions are tender.
Add drumstick pulp, salt, garam masala, coriander leaves
Cool a little.
Add ground gram, crumbled bread, mix into a lump.
Make small oblong cutlets with mixture, roll in breadcrumbs.
Chill for 10 minutes, reroll in breadcrumbs.
Fry in hot oil, till crisp and golden.
Serve hot with sauce, tamarind chutney, or green chutney.
Making time: 30 minutes
Makes: 15 cutlets
Shelflife: Unfried, refrigerated, 1 day . After frying, Best fresh

Drumsticks in Red Gravy

Ingredients
» 5 drumsticks, scraped, cut in 2″-3″ pieces
» 3 ripe firm tomatoes, grated
» 1 onion grated
» 2 flakes garlic grated
» 1″ piece ginger, grated
» 1 stalk curry leaves
» 1 tsp. coriander leaves finely chopped
» 1 tbsp. coconut, finely scraped
» 1 tsp. red chilli powder
» 1 tsp. coriander seed (dhania) powder
» 1/4 tsp. turmeric powder
» 1/4 tsp. garam masala powder
» 2 pinches asafoetida powder
» 1/2 tsp. sugar
» salt to taste
» 1/2 tsp. each cumin & mustard seeds
» 1 tbsp. oil

PreparationsHeat oil, add cumin & mustard seeds, asafoetida
Allow to splutter.
Add ginger, onion, garlic, stirfry till oil separates.
Add drumsticks, stir, cover and simmer till halfdone, stirring occasionally.
Add tomato, curryleaves, coconut, stir
Cover and cook till drumsticks are almost done.
Add all dry masalas, sugar, salt, 1/4 cup water.
Cover and cook till drumsticks are tender to touch.
Pour into serving bowl, garnish with coriander leaves.
Serve hot with thin phulkas, puris or steamed rice.
Making time: 30 minutes
Makes: 4-5 servings
Shelflife: Best fresh, refrigerated-2 days

Drumstick sabzi with gramflour

Ingredients
» 5 long fleshy drumsticks
» 1 tomato finely chopped
» 1 small capsicum finely chopped
» 1″ piece ginger grated
» 2 stalks curry leaves
» 2 green chillies, slit in half
» 1 tbsp. coriander leaves finely chopped
» 2 tsp. thick tamarind pulp
» 1/2 cup gramflour
» 1 tsp. red chilli powder
» 1/2 tsp. coriander seeds (dhania) powder
» 1/4 tsp. garam masala powder
» 3-4 pinches asafoetida
» 1/2 tsp. sugar
» salt to taste
» 1/2 tsp. each cumin & mustard seeds
» 2 tbsp. oil

PreparationsClean, scrape, cut into fingers size pieces
Boil drumstick pieces in 5 cups water, till tender.
Remove, drain, save water and keep aside.
Open fingers into vertical strips, usually 3 apiece.
Heat oil in a large heavy pan
Add cumin, mustard seeds, allow to splutter.
Add curryleaves, chillies, ginger, asafoetida, stir.
Add tomato, capsicum, drumsticks, stirfry for 2 minutes.
Add all dry masalas, salt and sugar to drained drumstick liquid.
Add gramflour, mix to a thin paste, adding more water if required.
Stir so no lumps are left.
Pour into simmering drumsticks, stir well till it starts boiling.
Cover, simmer till gravy becomes thick and bubbly.
When oil starts separating a bit, remove, pour into serving dish.
Garnish with coriander leaves, serve hot with parathas or phulkas.
Making time: 30 minutes
Makes: 5 servings
Shleflife: Best fresh

Drumstick-Aloo sabzi

Ingredients
» 6 drumsticks, peeled cut in fingers
» 3 potatoes, cut in chunks
» 1 onion finely chopped
» 1 tomato finely chopped
» 1 stalk curry leaves
» 1 tbsp. coriander leaves finely chopped
» 1 tsp. chilli powder
» 1 tsp. coriander seed powder
» 1/4 tsp. turmeric powder
» 1/4 tsp. garam masala powder
» 1 tsp. Maharasthrian black masala (kaala masala)
» salt to taste
» 1 tsp. wheat flour
» 1/2 tsp.mustard seeds
» 3-4 pinches asafoetida
» 3 tbsp. oil
Grind Together
» 1 small onion
» 5 garlic flakes
» 2″ piece ginger
» 2 red chillies
» 1/2 tsp. cumin seeds
» 1 tsp. sesame seeds
» 5-6 cashews
» 2 long tamarind strips
» 1 stalk mint leaves, plucked
» 1 tbsp. curds

PreparationsHeat 1 tbsp. oil, fry ground paste till oil separates
Keep aside.
Meanwhile, heat remaining oil in another large pan.
Add mustard seeds, curry leaves, asafoetida, allow to splutter.
Add potato and drumsticks, stir, sprinkle a little water, cover to cook.
Sprinkle water frequently, stirring each time, to cook evenly.
When potatoes are soft to pressure
Add all dry masala powders, salt, tomato, onion.
Stirfry till onions turn soft.
Add ground paste, half cup water, stir and cook further 2-3 minutes.
Sprinkle wheat flour, stir immediately to blend
Take off fire after a minute.
Pour into serving dish, garnish with chopped coriander.
Serve hot with rotis, phulkas, jowar or millet chappatis.
Making time: 45 minutes
Makes: 5 servings
Shelflife: 2 days

Drumstick leaf korma

Ingredients
» 2 cups tender plucked leaves of drumstick tree
» 1/2 cup split green gram with skin, washed soaked in 2 cups water
» 1 carrot peeled, chopped
» 5-6 French beans chopped
» 1 potato, scrubbed, washed, grated
» 3-4 green chillies
» 1″ piece ginger grated
» 1 stalk curry leaves
» 2 pinches asafoetida powder
» 1/4 tsp. turmeric powder
» 1/2 tsp. each cumin & mustard seeds
» salt to taste
» 2 tsp. lemon juice
» 2 tbsp. oil

PreparationsChop, wash, drain drumstick leaves.
Heat half oil in a pressure cooker.
Add carrots, drained gram, beans, 1 chopped chilli
Stirfry for 2-3 minutes.
Add potatoes, leaves, ginger, stir, add two cups hot water.
Add turmeric, salt, mix well.
Put lid, cook for two whistles.
Cool cooker, remove lid.
Add salt and lemon juice to tasteTo temper:Heat remaining oil in small pan, add seeds
Allow to splutter.
Add curry leaves, asafoetida, remaining chillies (halved)
Pour into while sizzling, into korma.
Stir gently, serve hot with jeera rice, or steamed rice.
Making time: 25 minutes
Makes: 3 servings
Shelflife: 1 day

Drumstick flower chutney

Ingredients
» 1 cup fresh drumstick flowers, washed, drained
» 3-4 green chillies
» 2 stalks mint leaves, plucked, cleaned
» 2 stalks curry leaves, plucked, cleaned
» 1/4 cup split dry roasted chickpeas (phutana)
» 1/4 cup fresh coconut grated
» 1 small flake garlic
» 1/2 tsp. ginger grated
» salt to taste
» 2 tsp. lemon juice
To temper
» 2 tsp. oil
» 1/2 tsp. urad dal
» 1/2 tsp. cumin seeds
» 1/2 tsp. mustard seeds
» 2 pinches asafoetida
» 1 stalk curry leaves, plucked
» 5-6 drumstick flowers, cleaned
» 1 tbsp. water

PreparationsGrind all ingredients together to a fine chutney.
Check salt and lemon juice to taste
Pour into dish.To TemperHeat oil in a small pan.
Add dal, seeds, asafoetida, allow to splutter.
Add curryleaves, flowers, water
Pour into chutney while sizzling.
Stir gently, serve with any snacks, dosas, vadas, or as an accompaniment to meals.
Making time: 15 minutes
Makes: 2 cups chutney
Shelflife: 2 days refrigeratedNote: If phutana is not available, one may use for every 1/4 cup phutana, 1 tbsp. bengal gram, soaked for at least one hour.Variation: One may use drumstick leaves in addition with the flowers, for taste and colour enhancement. One may also use red chillies instead of green.

Drumstick Thoran

Ingredients
» 5-6 drumsticks peeled, chopped like fingers
» 2 onions finely slivered
» 1/2 tsp. mustard seeds
» 1/2 tsp. rice grains
» 2 dry red chillies broken in half
» 2 tbsp. oil
» salt to taste
Grind to a paste
» 3/4 cup fresh coconut grated
» 1/2 tsp. cumin seeds
» 3 flakes garlic
» 2 green or red fresh chillies
» 2-3 pinches turmeric powder

PreparationsWash and put drumsticks to boil in 2 cups water.
Allow to cook covered in a pan till tender, then remove lid.
When almost all water has evaporated, empty and keep aside.
Put ground paste in same pan, cover with boiled drumsticks.
Sprinkle some salted water, cover and cook till steam is given out.
Stir gently, sprinkle some more water, cover and keep aside.
Heat oil in a small pan, add rice and mustard seeds.
Allow to splutter, add chillies and onions.
When onions are transparent, pour over drumstick mixture.
Simmer again, stirring gently, till all water is evaporated.
Serve hot with rice, chappati, etc.
Making time: 30 minutes
Makes: 6 servings
Shelflife: 1 day

THORAN

Drumstick (Muringakkai) 12
» Onion ½ cup cut into small pieces
» Green chilli 3 cut fine
» Garlic 4 pods
» Coconut ½ piece (grated)
» Turmeric powder ½ teaspoon
» Jeera powder One pinch
» Oil 2 table spoon
» Curry leaves
» One sprig
» Salt to taste

Cut drumstick lengthwise into two halves and take out the inside fleshy part with a spoon. Cut it into small pieces. Mix it with green chilli, garlic, onion, grated coconut, jeera, turmeric, curry leaves and salt. Mix well and keep it for 30 seconds.Heat oil in a separate pan, splutter mustard and put the mixture into it and mix with oil. Cover it with a lid and cook it using low flame for 6 minutes. When it is cooked stir well again for 2 minutes and remove from the flame.

DRUMSTICK SAMBAR

Drumstick (Muringakkai) 12
» Onion (small) – 1/4 kg
» Tomato – 4 nos
» Thuar Dhal – 1/2 kg
» Chilly powder – 2 tsp
» Coriander powder – 2 tsp
» Mustard -1 tsp
» Tamarind – lemon size
» Green chillies – 4 nos

PreparationsCook mashed dhal. Tamarind to be kept soake in water for 10 mts. Take puree. Put mustard in 1 tsp oil and allow it to split. Add chopped onions green chillies, tomato, turmeric powder, chilli powder, coriander powder and fry it for 2 seconds.Add salt to taste. Allow it to boil for 10 mts Remove from fire and serve hot. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves and curry leaves.SHRIMP SUAM*
Ingredients:
2 T. shortening 1-1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. minced garlic 5 c. water
2 T. sliced onion 12 fresh shrimp, trimmed
1 T. ginger, cut into strips 2 c. moringa leaves, washed and sorted
1 T. fish sauce
Preparation: Saute garlic, onion and ginger in shortening, in large fry pan. Add fish sauce, salt and water.
Bring to a boil, and add shrimp. Cover and cook 10 minutes longer. Serve at once, Serves 6.

MUNG BEAN STEW
Ingredients:
4 T. cooking fat 1/2 c. shrimp juice
1 tsp. minced garlic 1/2 c. pork broth
2 T. sliced onion 3 c. water
1/2 c. sliced tomatoes 4-1/4 tsp. salt
1/2 c. sliced boiled pork dash of pepper
1/2 c. sliced shrimp 3 c. moringa leaves, washed and sorted
1 c. dried mung bean, boiled
Preparation: Saute garlic, onion and tomatoes in large fry pan. Add pork and shrimp. Cover and cook 3
minutes. Add mung bean, shrimp juice, pork broth and water. Cover and bring to a boil. Season with salt and
pepper, then add moringa leaves and cook 5 minutes longer. Serves 6.

DINENGDENG II*
Ingredients:
1/2 c. dried pigeon pea or 2 large tomatoes, sliced
Congo pea boiled in 1 1 medium-size fish cut into slices and boiled
c. water 10 young okra, cut into 1” lengths
3 c. water 1/4 c. fish paste
2 c. cowpea or yard-long
bean cut into 2″ lengths
2 c. moringa leaves
1/2 medium onion, sliced
Page 6 Moringa Recipes
Preparation: Add water to cooked pigeon pea or Congo pea in large saucepan. Boil, and add cowpea or yardlong
bean. Cover and cook 3 minutes. Add fish paste, onion, tomatoes, fish and okra. Cover and boil 2
minutes. Do not stir vegetables. Add moringa leaves, cover, and cook 5 minutes longer. Serve hot. Serves 6.

SAUTEED MORINGA PODS
Ingredients:
2 c. fresh moringa pods 2-1/2 c. shrimp juice from pounded heads of shrimp
2 T. shortening 2 T. shrimp paste
1 tsp. minced garlic 1 tsp. salt
2 T. sliced onion 1 c. fresh lima or butter bean seeds, peeled
1/2 c. sliced tomatoes 1 c. green cowpea or yard-long bean pods cut into 1-1/2″ lengths
1 c. boiled pork, diced
1/2 c. shrimp, shelled
and sliced lengthwise
Preparation: Cut moringa pods lengthwise into 4 pieces. Slice white pulp including tender seeds. Discard
outer covering. Cut pulp into 1-1/2 inch lengths. Saute garlic, onion, and tomatoes. Add pork and shrimp.
Cover, and cook 2 minutes. Add shrimp juice, and boil. Season with fish paste and salt. Add lima or butter
beans, and cook 3 minutes. Add moringa pulp and cowpea or yard-long bean. Cover, and cook 10 minutes.
Serves 6

.JAMBALYA CAMP
Ingredients:
1 c. rice 1/2 c. winged bean, blanched
1 onion, chopped 1 carrot, sliced thinly
3 T. oil 1 green pepper, sliced thinly
1 c. ground pork 1/2 c. pigeon or Congo pea seeds
3/4 c. tomatoes, chopped 1/2 c. moringa leaves
1 T. finely chopped celery 3 T. fish sauce
1/2 c. small fresh-water
clams (no shell)
3 c. water (soup of boiled clams)

CORN WITH MORINGA LEAVES
Moringa Recipes Page 7
Ingredients:
2 c. grated young corn 1 small sponge gourd (luffa)
2 cloves garlic 1 c. moringa
1 head onion 1-1/2 Accent or MSG
3 c. water salt to taste
Preparation: Saute garlic and onion in medium fry pan. Add water and let it boil. Then add the corn, stirring
often to avoid burning. When cooked, add the gourd and moringa.

MIXED VEGETABLE EMBOTIDO*
Ingredients:
1-1/2 c pigeon or Congo peas, 1 c. meat from unripe coconut
boiled and mashed 1 red pepper
1 c. moringa leaves or fruit 1 green pepper
1 c. squash, grated 3 beaten eggs
1-1/2 c carrots, grated 1 onion, chopped
4 T. margarine 1/2 c. winged beans
1 head garlic, chopped pepper and salt to taste
Preparation: Mix all ingredients above. Wrap in plastic bags, and tie both ends. Steam for 45 minutes.

SAUTED PIGEON PEA OR CONGO PEA, PAPAYA, MORINGA AND WINGED BEAN WITH LIVER
Ingredients:
1-1/4 c. pigeon or Congo peas 1/2 c. liver
3 quarts water 3 T. salt
3/4 c. cooking oil 2 c. water
4 segments garlic 1-3/4 c. winged bean
1-1/4 c. tomatoes 2 c. moringa leaves
Preparation: Boil peas until cooked. Set aside. Saute garlic, onion and tomatoes. Add liver. Cover and cook
until liver is tender. Season. Add water. Add winged bean and papaya. Cover and cook 10 minutes. Add
cooked peas and moringa leaves. Serve hot.

PIGEON PEA OR CONGO PEA WITH PORK AND BANANA BLOSSOM
Ingredients:
1 c. peas 1 c. winged bean
1 pc banana blossom 1/2 moringa leaves
1 leg pork ginger
1 c. roselle salt to taste
Preparation: Brown pork. Remove from heat, and cut into cubes about 2 inches in size. Boil peas and pork leg
until tender. Add ginger and salt to taste. Add banana blossoms and winged beans. When tender, add roselle
and onions.

CHICKEN WITH PIGEON OR CONGO PEA, PAPAYA, MORINGA AND WINGED BEAN
Page 8 Moringa Recipes
Ingredients:
1 medium size chicken 1 onion
1-1/2 c. boiled pigeon or Congo pea 1 tomato
2 pcs green medium size papaya 3 cloves garlic
1 c. winged beans salt or Accent to taste
1 c. moringa leaves
Preparation: Saute garlic, onion and tomato. Add sliced chicken, boiled peas, and boil for 20 minutes. Then
add papaya and winged beans, and boil another 10 minutes. Add Accent and salt to taste. Put in moringa
leaves before removing from heat. Serve hot.

PIGEON PEA OR CONGO PEA, PAPAYA, MORINGA AND WINGED BEAN HAMBURGER
Ingredients:
1 c. boiled peas, mashed 1/2 c. papaya, chopped
1/2 c. string beans,chopped 1/2 c. flour
1/2 c. moringa 2 eggs
1 big sized onion,chopped 2 segments garlic
oil to fry; salt to taste
Preparation: Saute garlic, onions and tomatoes. Add mashed peas, papaya, winged beans, and set aside. Beat
eggs and add flour. Add moringa leaves to sauted ingredients, and mix with beaten eggs.

POCHERO A LA BERDING GULAY
Ingredients:
1 c. peeled & sliced unripe papaya 3 stems green onions
1 c. moringa leaves 1 small pc ginger (thinly sliced)
1 c. green beans or winged beans 1 T. cooking oil
3 pcs ripe tomato 5 black pepper, whole
3 pcs ripe banana 3 c. water
1 c. dried minnow salt to taste
1 clove garlic
Preparation: Saute the garlic and ginger in cooking oil until slightly brown. Add the water and bring to a boil.
Add the banana, beans and black pepper. Cover, and continue to boil. When half-done add the sliced papaya,
dried minnow, tomatoes, green onions, and salt to taste. Lastly, add the moringa leaves. Remove from heat
when done, and serve while hot. Serves 8.

MASQUADILLA TORTA*
Ingredients:
1/2 c. moringa leaves 3 eggs, beaten
1 c. winged bean pods, 3 pcs tomato, sliced
finely chopped 1/2 c. shredded papaya
3/4 c. shredded squash 1/2 c. onion, sliced
1/2 c. powdered mung bean 5 segments garlic
Moringa Recipes Page 9
1/4 c. powdered dried minnow Salt & pepper to taste
Preparation: Mix moringa pods, leaves, shredded papaya, squash, powdered dried minnow, powdered mung
bean, tomatoes, beaten eggs, onion, garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Place one piece of 5 x 5 banana leaf on a
plate, and pour the mixture on it. Then deep fry in oil until golden brown. Garnish with sliced tomatoes, onions
and calamansi*. Serves 8.

PIGEON OR CONGO PEA, PAPAYA, MORINGA, WINGED BEAN CHICKEN GUINAT-AN*
Ingredients:
3 pcs tomato 8 pcs winged bean
1 small papaya 1 c. coconut milk
1 c. boiled pigeon or Congo pea 1 c. palm heart
2-1/2 c. sliced chicken 3 pcs garlic
1 c. moringa leaves 1 small ginger
3 c. water 1 onion
Salt to taste
Preparation: Saute garlic, onions, tomato and ginger in hot oil. Add the sliced chicken and boil with salt. Then
add the water, and boil until the chicken is done. Add the papaya, palm heart, winged beans and pigeon or
Congo pea. Lastly, add the moringa and coconut milk. Season to taste.

VEGETABLE DELIGHT
Ingredients:
1 c. pure coconut milk 1 small pc ginger
1/3 c. pure coconut milk reserve 3 pcs bell pepper, green & red, quartered
5 pcs fish, preferably tilapia 1/2 c. moringa leaves
1 onion bulb, sliced 1-2 T. cooking oil
1 head garlic, crushed 1 t. crushed black pepper
3 tomatoes, quartered 1/2 c. pigeon or Congo peas
8-10 winged beans or string 1 c. cubed yellow sweet potato
beans, quartered
Preparation: Saute garlic in oil until brown. Add onion. Transfer to unglazed cooking pot, then add 1 c. pure
coconut milk, winged beans, pigeon or Congo peas, yellow sweet potato, fish, and ginger. Let it boil until halfdone.
Add bell peppers and tomatoes. Season with salt and crushed pepper. Add the rest of the coconut milk
and moringa. Boil for 5 minutes, and serve.

PATALBOG*
Ingredients:
1 c. sliced papaya 4 c. water
1 c. moringa leaves 1 tsp. salt
1 c. winged beans ginger and seasoning to taste
1 c. pigeon or Congo peas
Preparation: Wash peas and papaya (which have been sliced into elongated pieces). Remove young moringa
leaves from stems, and place in a cup. Slice winged beans to desired size, and wash. Pare ginger, and pound.
Page 10 Moringa Recipes
Place all ingredients in a casserole accordingly. Cook for 15 minutes or until all vegetables are tender. Serve
hot. Serves 4.

SAUTED YOUNG PIGEON OR CONGO PEAS
Ingredients:
2 c. dried minnow 2 T. oil
2 c. moringa leaves 2 tsp. soy sauce
1 c. young pigeon or Congo peas 1 medium size onion
1/2 c. sliced tomato 3 cloves garlic
1 c. sliced squash salt to taste
Preparation: Saute garlic, onions and tomatoes. Add fish, squash and peas, and cover. Cook for 10 minutes.
Add moringa leaves, and continue cooking for 3 minutes. Remove from heat and serve hot.

DINENGDENG
Ingredients:
1 c. pigeon or Congo peas, boiled 1 T. fish paste or
1 c. green papaya, sliced into salted fish
small pieces 1 pc ginger
1 c. moringa leaves 2 medium tomatoes, sliced
1 c. winged beans, sliced into strips
1 c. roasted walking catfish or mullet
Preparation: Boil 2 c. water in a casserole. Add the fish paste, ginger, and roasted fish for 15 minutes. Then
add the previously boiled peas, green papaya, and winged beans. Cook until tender. Add the moringa leaves
last, and cook 2-3 minutes more. Add a pinch of Accent or salt to taste. Serve hot. Serves 4.

PINAMILIT NA “HALUWAN” (DALAG)*
Ingredients:
1 c. tilapia (roasted fish) 1 onion
4 c. coconut milk 1 small ginger
2 c. water 1 pc papaya
1 c. moringa leaves black pepper to taste
Preparation: Boil the coconut milk with water. After boiling, mix the fish with the spices for 5 minutes. Add
the papaya and let it boil for 5 minutes, then add the moringa leaves. Cook for 5 minutes more. Remove from
heat. Serve hot. Serves 4.

3-IN-1 RECIPE
Ingredients:
1/2 c. coconut milk, dilute 1/2 c. shrimp paste
1 c. dried shrimp 2 pcs green pepper,
1/2 papaya, unripe, cut into strips (cut into strips)
Moringa Recipes Page 11
3 c. moringa leaves 1 segment garlic & onion, minced
Preparation: Boil coconut milk, shrimp, garlic, and onions for 10 minutes. Season with shrimp paste, and
continue stirring. Add cooked peas, papaya, green pepper, and moringa leaves. Cook 5 minutes longer. Serve
hot. Serves 6.

MSG or Accent
Preparation: Wash rice and soak in small bowl for 1 hour, then drain. Fry onion in cooking oil until tender, but
not brown. Set aside. Fry pork and add tomatoes and fish sauce. Add 3 c. soup of boiled clams. When boiling,
stir in rice slowly on low fire. When rice is half cooked add the other ingredients. Cover tightly and cook
slowly. Serve hot with sliced papaya. Seves 6.

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All Things Moringa Review

Apr 13, 16
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 “All Things Moringa”

The Story of an Amazing Tree of Life Contents Introduction Vitamin Mineral Content of Moringa Amino Acid Content of Moringa The Moringa.

Here’s a sample of the 1st 6 of 42 pages

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The Most Nutrient Plant On Earth

Apr 12, 16
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Free Moringa eBook Giveaway

You’ll Discover:

  • The diversity of this amazing plant
  • How it has the potential to change the world’s nutritional needs
  • Answer the malnutrition dilemma to change & save lives!
  • Where to find products & trees

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Moringa grows in over 80 countries

Apr 11, 16
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Moringa [Ben/Behen], is known as the miracle tree – and with good reason.  It grows to a height of only 7 – 12 m and has a lifespan of a mere 20 years.  Though not as impressive in stature or longevity as the beloved baobab, it can more than hold its own in the impressive stakes.

Moringa has a short, but intense life, growing like the clappers.  It can grow up to 4 m in in a season – taking a mere 10 months from seed to tree!  As the maxim goes ‘Dynamite comes in small packets’ – and the mighty moringa sure validates this claim, and then some.

Naturally Healthy Moringa  now has stocks avaailable  from various suppliers like Zija International also :

  • Powdered leaves to add to soups, stews, juices and smoothies.
  • Tea for making herbal infusions.
  • Capsules for taking internally as a supplement.
  • High quality oil for massage and manufacture.

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Moringa grows in over 80 countries, is known by over 200 different common names, and is referenced in over 300 folk medicine remedies.  Also known as the Drumstick Tree, and Famine Tree, Moringa’s virtues have even been passionately extolled by Dr Oz on TV, and lauded in print in the National Geographic [Nov 2012] magazine.

ancient moringaMoringa is one of the most ancient oils known to humans and its healing properties, which have been documented by ancient cultures [Greeks, Romans, Egyptians], have stood the test of time – and still come out with flying colours to this day.

All parts of this revered tree, native to Africa and India, are used for their pharmacological and nutritional properties, hence the ‘Miracle tree’ appellation. Moringa’s leaves and seeds are full of health-giving nutrients and skin-loving fatty acids.  It is used in cooking, cosmetics, medicine and lubrication – and even has potential as a biofuel.

Along with the other unique African oils, Moringa has become the latest darling of the natural and commercial cosmetic industries, due to its remarkable skin-smoothing, radiance-boosting, decongesting, detoxifying, moisturising, conditioning and anti-ageing properties.

Moringa and stability

Moringa amphora

Moringa amphora

Besides its many other virtues, Moringa oil possesses exceptional oxidative stability, which may explain why the Egyptians placed vases of this oil in their tombs to assist them in the afterlife  – so chance is a good thing that Cleopatra knew all about this facet of Moringa’s impressive profile!

Here is a picture of the Moringa Amphora from the Tomb of Maiherpri * [his name can be translated as Lion of the Battlefield].  Some of the dockets attached to the jars indicated that they had contained b3k-oil, a very expensive commodity made from Moringa nuts.

* Maiherpri was an Ancient Egyptian noble of Nubian origin buried in the Valley of the Kings, in tomb KV36.  He probably lived during the rule of Thutmose IV, [the 8th Pharoah of the 18th dynasty of Egypt, who ruled in approximately the 14th century BC.

For the aromatic perfumers out there ..…..…

Did you know that Moringa oil was used for perfumery long before the advent of alcohol  distillation  and  other modern day diluent chemicals?

Distillation dates back to more or less the 4th century BC.

During these times aromatics were extracted by steeping plant material or splinters of fragrant wood in oil to extract the essential oils.  The macerated material would eventually be placed in cloth and wrung out until the last vestiges of aroma had been retrieved.  Alternatively the material was boiled with oil and water and the aromatic essential oil skimmed off.  Besides Moringa, other oils like balanos [from the seeds of the Balanites aegyptiaca tree], castor, linseed, olive, sesame, safflower and sometimes almond were used.

Traditional perfumers however held [and hold] Moringa oil in esteem for its exceptional fixative powers i.e. it can absorb and retain even the most elusive scents, locking the aromatic molecules into the oil.  Another one of the reasons for my enduring love affair with this divine oil.

There are reports of Moringa being used in cosmetic preparations as far back as 1400 BC, wherein an allegedly successful remedy to treat wrinkles consisted of: gum of frankincense wax; fresh Moringa oil and Cyprus grass [Cyperus alternifolius] – a grass-like marsh plant of the Cyperaceae [or sour grasses] family that is also used to make papyrus.  The mixture was ground finely, mixed with fermented plant juice, and applied daily.  Let me know if you try it and it works!

These days Moringa seed oil is in much demand for natural and luxury cosmetics because of its stability profile and resistance to rancidity, which is due to high levels of powerful antioxidants.

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How to Grow, Plant, Cultivate the Moringa Tree

Apr 09, 16
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What could be easier than walking into your yard, and gathering healthy leaves from your own grown Moringa plants to put on the table?

Grow plant moringa oleifera tree

The Moringa plant is a fast-growing, drought resistant tree that can reach up to 3 meters in its first year.

The Moringa tree is very easy to grow. Simply plant seeds or cuttings in a sunny spot. The moringa tree is a plant that grows mainly in semiarid, subtropical areas.

Moringa Tree, A Home Gardening SolutionTo Combat Malnutrition

Learn how to grow your own multivitamin and have a Moringa farmacy at your doorstep.  Grow Many Moringa’s in a Square Meter

The Moringa tree is very easy to grow. Simply plant seeds or cuttings in a sunny spot.

Moringa is a fast-growing, drought resistant tree. The moringa tree is a plant that grows mainly in semiarid, subtropical areas. Moringa can grow in dry, sandy or poor soils.

Get a little Moringa in your diet, you can plant and grow your own multivitamin!

plant grow cultivate moringa

Moringa A plant with multiple medicinal uses and benefits

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Easy Instructions

  1. Find a sunny place
  2. Make square holes in the ground 30 to 60 cm deep
  3. Fill the hole with loose ground
  4. Plant the seed 1 cm deep
  5. Give the ground some water but not too much, otherwise the seed may rotten.
  6. Within 1-2 weeks the Miracle springs out the ground! 🙂

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Expert

Moringa oleifera is believed to be native to sub-Himalayan tracts of northern India but is now found worldwide in the tropics and sub-tropics. It grows best in direct sunlight under 500 meters altitude. It tolerates a wide range of soil conditions, but prefers a neutral to slightly acidic (pH. 6.3-7.0), well-drained sandy or loamy soil. Minimum annual rainfall requirements are estimated at 250mm with maximum at over 3,000mm, but in waterlogged soil the roots have a tendency to rot. (In areas with heavy rainfall, trees can be planted on small hills to encourage water run-off). Presence of a long taproot makes it resistant to periods of drought. Trees can be easily grown from seed or from cuttings. Temperature ranges are 25-35 degrees Celsius (0-95 degrees Fahrenheit), but the tree will tolerate up to 48 degrees in the shade and it can survive a light frost.
plant moringaMoringa seeds have no dormancy period, so they can be planted as soon as they are mature and they will retain the ability to germinate for up to one year. Older seeds woll only have spotty germination. Moringa trees will flower and fruit annually and in some regions twice annually. During its first year, a Moringa tree will grow up to five meters in height and produce flowers and fruit. Left alone, the tree can eventually reach 12 meters in height with a trunk 30cm wide; however, the tree can be annually cut back to one meter from the ground. The tree will quickly recover and produce leaves and pods within easy reach. Within three years a tree will yield 400-600 pods annually and a mature tree can produce up to 1,600 pods. Copicing to the ground is also possible, and will produce a Moringa bush is no main new growth is selected, and the others eliminated.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – IN THE NURSERY

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Use poly bags with dimensions of about 18cm or 8″ in height and 12cm or 4-5″ in diameter. The soil mixture for the sacks should be light, i.e. 3 parts soil to 1 part sand. Plant two or three seeds in each sack, one to two centimeters deep. Keep moist but not too wet. Germination will occur within 5 to 12 days, depending on the age of the seed and pre-treatment method used. Remove extra seedlings, leaving one in each sack. Seedlings can be out-planted when they are 60-90cm high. When out-planting, cut a hole in the bottom of the sack big enough to allow the roots to emerge. Be sure to retain the soil around the roots of the seedling. To encourage rapid germination, one of three pre-seeding treatments can be employed:
1. Soak the seeds in water overnight before planting.
2. Crack the shells before planting.
3. Remove shells and plant kernels only.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – IN THE FIELD

If planting a large plot it is recommended to first plough the land. Prior to planting a seed or seedling, dig a planting pit about 50cm in depth and the same in width. This planting hole serves to loosen the soil and helps to retain moisten in the root zone, enabling the seedlings’ roots to develop rapidly. Compost or manure at the rate of 5kg per pit can be mixed with the fresh topsoil around the pit and used to fill the pit. Avoid using the soil taken out of the pit for this purpose: fresh topsoil contains beneficial microbes that can promote more effective root growth. The day before out planting, water the filled pits or wait until a good rain before out-planting seedlings. Fill in the hole before transplanting the seedling. In areas of heavy rainfall, the soil can be shaped in the form of a mound to encourage drainage. Do not water heavily for the first few days. If the seedlings fall over, tie them to stick 40cm high for support.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – DIRECT SEEDING

If water is available for irrigation (i.e., in a backyard garden), moringa trees can be seeded directly and grown anytime during the year. Prepare a planting pit first, water, and then fill in the pit with topsoil mixed with compost or manure before planting seeds. In a large field, trees can be seeded directly at the beginning of the wet season.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – GROWING MORINGA FROM CUTTINGS

Use hard wood, not green wood, for cuttings. Cuttings should be 45cm to 1.5m long and 10cm thick. Cuttings can be planted directly or planted in sacks in the nursery. When planting directly, plant the cuttings in light, sandy soil. Plant one-third of the length in the ground (i.e., if the cutting is 1.5m long, plant it 50cm deep). Do not over water; if the soil is too heavy or wet, the roots may rot. When the cuttings are planted in the nursery, the root system isslow to develop. Add phosphorus to the soil if possible to encourage root development. Cuttings planted in a nursery can be out-planted after 2 or 3 months.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – SPACING

For intensive Moringa production, plant the tree every 3 meters in rows 3 meters apart. To ensure sufficient sunlight and airflow, it is also recommendedto plant the trees in an east-west direction. When the trees are part of an alley-cropping system, there should be 10 meters between the rows. The area between trees should be kept free of weeds.

Trees are often spaced in a line one meter or less apart in order to create living fence posts. Trees are also planted to provide support for climbing crops such as pole beans, although only mature trees should be used for this purpose since the vine growth can choke off the young tree. Moringa trees can be planted in gardens; the tree’s root system does not compete with other crops for surface nutrients and the light shade provided by the tree will be beneficial to those vegetables which are less tolerant to direct sunlight. From the second year onwards, Moringa can be inter-cropped with maize, sunflower and other field crops. Sunflower is particularly recommended for helping to control weed growth.[1] However, Moringa trees are reported to be highly competitive with eggplant (Solanum melongena) and sweet corn (Zea mays) and can reduce their yields by up to 50%.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – PINCHING THE TERMINAL TIPS

When the seedlings reach a height of 60cm in the main field, pinch (trim) the terminal growing tip 10cm from the top. This can be done using fingers since the terminal growth is tender, devoid of bark fiber and brittle, and therefore easily broken. A shears or knife blade can also be used. Secondary branches will begin appearing on the main stem below the cut about a week later. When they reach a length of 20cm, cut these back to 10cm. Use a sharp blade and make a slanting cut. Tertiary branches will appear, and these are also to be pinched in the same manner. This pinching, done four times before the flowers appear (when the tree is about three months old), will encourage the tree to become bushy and produce many pods within easy reach. Pinching helps the tree develop a strong production frame for maximizing the yield. If the pinching is not done, the tree has a tendency to shoot up vertically and grow tall, like a mast, with sparse flowers and few fruits found only at the very top.

For annual Moringa types, directly following the end of the harvest, cut the tree’s main trunk to about 90cm from ground level. About two weeks later 15 to 20 sprouts will appear below the cut. Allow only 4-5 robust branches to grow and nib the remaining sprouts while they are young, before they grow long and harden. Continue the same pinching process as done with new seedlings so as to make the tree bushy. After the second crop, the trees can be removed and new seedlings planted for maximum productivity.

For perennial Moringa types, remove only the dead and worn out branches every year. Once in four or five years, cut the tree back to one meter from ground level and allow re-growth. Complete copicing is.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – WATERING

Moringa trees do not need much watering, which make them ideally suited for the climate of places such as Southern California. In very dry conditions, water regularly for the first two months and afterwards only when the tree is  obviously suffering. Moringa trees will flower and produce pods whenever there is sufficient water available.

If rainfall is continuous throughout the year, Moringa trees will have a nearly continuous yield. In arid conditions, flowering can be induced through irrigation.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – FERTILIZING

Moringa trees will generally grow well without adding very much fertilizer. Manure or compost can be mixed with the soil used to fill the planting pits. Phosphorus can be added to encourage root development and nitrogen will encourage leaf canopy growth. In some parts of India, 15cm-deep ring trenches are dug about 10cm from the trees during the rainy season and filled with green leaves, manure and ash. These trenches are then covered with soil.

This approach is said to promote higher pod yields. Research done in India has also showed that applications of 7.5kg farmyard manure and 0.37kg ammonium  sulfate per tree can increase pod yields threefold.[3]

Biodynamic composts yield the best results, with yield increases of of to 50% compared to ordinary composts.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – PESTS AND DISEASES

Moringa is resistant to most pests. In very water-logged conditions, Diplodia root rot can occur. In very wet conditions, seedlings can be planted in mounds so that excess water is drained off. Cattle, sheep, pigs and goats will eat Moringa seedlings, pods and leaves. Protect Moringa seedlings from livestock by installing a fence or by planting a living fence around the plantation. A living fence can be grown with Jatropha curcas, whose seeds also produce an oil good for soap-making. For mature trees, the lower branches can be cut off so that goats will not be able to reach the leaves and pods. Termites can be a problem, especially when cuttings are planted.

Among approaches recommended to protect seedlings from termite attack:

· Apply mulches of castor oil plant leaves, mahogany chips, tephrosia leaves or Persian lilac leaves around the base of the plants.

· Heap ashes around the base of seedlings.

· Dry and crush stems and leaves of lion’s ear or Mexican poppy and spread the dust around the base of plants.

In India, various caterpillars are reported to cause defoliation unless controlled by spraying. The budworm Noordia moringae and the scale insects Diaspidotus sp. and Ceroplastodes cajani are reportedly able to cause serious damage. Also mentioned as pests in India are Aphis craccibora, the borer Diaxenopsis apomecynoides and the fruit fly Gitonia sp. Elsewhere in the world, where Moringa is an introduced tree, local pests are less numerous.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – HARVESTING

When harvesting pods for human consumption, harvest when the pods are still young (about 1cm in diameter) and snap easily. Older pods develop a tough exterior, but the white seeds and flesh remain edible until the ripening process begins.

When producing seed for planting or for oil extraction, allow the pods to dry and turn brown on the tree. In some cases, it may be necessary to prop up a branch that holds many pods to prevent it breaking off. Harvest the pods before they split open and seeds fall to the ground. Seeds can be stored in well-ventilated sacks in dry, shady places.

For making leaf sauces, harvest seedlings, growing tips or young leaves. Older leaves must be stripped from the tough and wiry stems. These older leaves are more suited to making dried leaf powder since the stems are removed in the pounding and sifting process.

Adapted from Lowell J. Fuglie and K. V. Sreeja by Dr F. Annenber

Discover the many health benefits of Moringa

Suggested Cultural Practices for Moringa by M.C. Palada and L.C. Chang

Moringa is one of the world’s most useful plants. This fast-growing tree is grown throughout the tropics for human food, livestock forage, medicine, dye, and water purification. It is known by several names in different countries, but is popularly called the “drumstick tree” for its pods that are used by drummers and the “horseradish tree” for the flavor of its roots.

Moringa is one of the world’s most nutritious crops. Ounce for ounce, the leaves of moringa have more beta-carotene than carrots, more protein than peas, more vitamin C than oranges, more calcium than milk, more potassium than bananas, and more iron than spinach. Native to South Asia, this tree is becoming a vital source of nutrition in this region, where most of the world’s poor people live. The multiple uses of moringa have attracted the attention of researchers, development workers, and farmers.

The following suggested cultural practices were developed at AVRDC in the Taiwan lowlands. Growers may need to modify the practices to suit local soil, weather, pest, and disease conditions.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Climate and soil requirements

Moringa tolerates a wide range of environmental conditions. It grows best between 25 to 35oC, but will tolerate up to 48oC in the shade and can survive a light frost. The drought-tolerant tree grows well in areas receiving annual rainfall amounts that range from 250 to 1500 mm. Altitudes below 600 m are best for moringa, but this adaptable tree can grow in altitudes up to 1200 m in the tropics.

Moringa prefers a well-drained sandy loam or loam soil, but tolerates clay. It will not survive under prolonged flooding and poor drainage. Moringa tolerates a soil pH of 5.0–9.0.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Preparing the field

Moringa requires thorough land preparation and a well-prepared seedbed. At AVRDC, moringa is planted on 30-cm-high raised beds to facilitate drainage. Bed widths being tested at the Center vary from 60–200 cm.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Choosing a Moringa variety

Among moringa species, Moringa oleifera and Moringa stenopetala are most commonly grown. Moringa oleifera is most widely cultivated and the focus of this guide. Varieties within Moringa oleifera differ in growing habit, leaf, flower, and pod characteristics (Fig. 3). Numerous accessions are being evaluated at AVRDC for superior production and nutrition qualities. Currently we recommend growers to use locally adapted lines. Characteristics of superior types include wide and dark green leaves, long and tender pods, bushy habit, and rapid regeneration after trimming.

Moringa Planting methods

Moringa is planted either by direct seeding, transplanting, or using hard stem cuttings. Direct seeding is preferred when plenty of seed is available and labor is limited. Transplanting allows flexibility in field planting but requires extra labor and cost in raising seedlings. Stem cuttings are used when the availability of seed is limited but labor is plentiful.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Direct seeding

Sow two or three seeds per hill at a depth of 2 cm. Two weeks after germination, thin to the strongest seedling per hill.

For leaf, pod and seed production, space plants 3–5 m apart between rows and plants. If using raised beds, form beds with 2-m-wide tops, and space plants 3–5 m apart in a single row.

For production of leaves only, space plants 50 cm within rows spaced 1 m apart. If using raised beds, form beds with 60-cm-wide tops and space plants 1 m apart in a single row. For intensive production of leaves, space plants 10–20 cm within rows 30–50 cm apart.

Closer spacing allows harvest of young edible shoots every two to three weeks.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Transplanting

Transplanting moringa consists of two steps: seed- ling production and field planting. Seedlings can be grown in divided trays, individual pots, plastic bags, or seedbeds. Use of divided trays and individual containers is preferred because there is less damage to seedlings when they are transplanted.

A 50-cell tray with cells 3–4 cm wide and deep is suitable. Fill the tray with a potting mix that has good water-holding capacity and good drainage. Use peat moss, commercial potting soil, or a pot- ting mix prepared from soil, compost or rice hulls, and vermiculite or sand. AVRDC uses a mixture of 67% peat moss and 33% coarse vermiculite. If you use non-sterile components, sterilize the mix by autoclaving or baking at 150Grow seedlings under shade or in a screenhouse with 50% shade. Sow two or three seeds per cell. One week after germination, thin to the strongest seedling. Irrigate seedlings thoroughly every morning or as needed (moist, but not wet), using a fine mist sprinkler to avoid soil splash and plant damage. Transplant seedlings one month after sowing.

Pots or bags may be used to grow larger trans- plants. Fill the containers (0.5–1.0 kg by volume) with potting mix similar to that used in seedling trays. If potting mix is not available, use 3 parts soil to 1 part sand. Sow two or three seeds per pot or bag. One week after germination, thin to the strongest seedling. These plants are transplanted in the field after they reach 50 cm high.

If seedlings are started in a raised seedbed, the soil should be partially sterilized by burning a 3–5 cm layer of rice straw or other organic matter on the bed. The burned ash adds minor amounts of P and K to the soil. Sow two or three seeds in holes spaced 10 cm apart in furrows spaced 25 cm apart. Cover seedbed with a fine-mesh nylon net to protect seedlings from pests, heavy rain, and harsh sunlight. Transplant seedlings one month after sowing or when they reach 20–30 cm high. Dig seedlings using a trowel taking care that roots are not damaged. Place the bare-root seedlings in a bucket containing water and transplant them as soon as possible.

Field planting. Spacing’s are similar to those recommended in the direct seeding method.

Moringa may also be planted 1 m apart or closer in a row to establish living fence posts. Trees can be planted in gardens to provide shade to vegetables less tolerant to direct sunlight. Moringa trees are also used to support climbing crops such as yam and pole beans. Trees are also planted in hedgerows forming wide alleys where vegetables are planted within. Choose vegetables that are adapted to alley cropping, such as shade-tolerant leafy vegetables and herbs, since moringa hedgerows are highly competitive and can reduce yields of companion plants significantly.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Using stem cuttings

Compared to trees planted from seed, trees from stem cuttings grow faster but develop a shallow root system that makes them more susceptible to moisture stress and wind damage.

Make stem cuttings using branches of a tree that is at least one year old. Use hard wood and avoid using young green stem tissue. Cuttings can be 45–150 cm long with diameters of 4–16 cm. Cuttings can be dried in the shade for three days before planting in the nursery or in the field. Cut- tings are then planted directly or planted in plastic pots or bags in the nursery or screenhouse. When planting directly, plant cuttings in light, sandy soil. Plant one- third of the length in the soil (i.e., if the cutting is 90 cm long, plant it 30 cm deep). Add a balanced fertilizer or compost to infertile soils to en- courage root development. Irrigate regularly to keep the soil moist but not wet. Cuttings planted in a nursery are ready for field planting after 2– 3 months. Follow the field planting recommendations mentioned for direct seeding and transplanting.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Controlling pests and diseases

Fertilizing

Moringa grows well in most soils without additions of fertilizer. Once established, the extensive and deep root system of moringa is efficient in mining nutrients from the soil.

For optimum growth and yields, fertilizers are applied at planting time. Dig trenches around the base of the plant (10–20 cm from the base) and apply approximately 300 g of a commercial nitro- gen fertilizer per tree. If commercial nitrogen fertilizer is not available, use compost or well-rotted farmyard manure at the rate of 1–2 kg/tree.

Irrigating Moringa

Irrigate newly transplanted trees immediately after transplanting to promote early root development. In dry and arid climates, irrigate regularly for the first two months. Once established, moringa rarely need watering. The well-rooted tree tolerates drought and needs irrigation only when persistent wilting is evident.

Controlling weeds

Cultivate the soil thoroughly before planting to sup- press early weed growth. Apply straw and/or plastic mulch around the base of each young tree. Maintain a weed-free planting by regularly cultivating between beds and rows.

Moringa is resistant to most pests and diseases, but outbreaks may occur under certain conditions. For example, diplodia root rot may appear in waterlogged soils, causing severe wilting and death of plants. Mite populations can increase during dry and cool weather. These pests create yellowing of leaves, but plants usually recover during warm weather. Other insect pests include termites, aphids, leafminers, whiteflies, and caterpillars.

Chemical control of insect pests should be used only when severe infestations occur. Choose a pesticide that targets the specific pest causing the damage, and avoid pesticides that kill or inhibit the development of beneficial organisms. Choose pesticides that last only a few days.

Cattle, sheep, pigs, and goats will eat moringa seedlings, pods and leaves. Protect moringa seedlings from livestock by installing fence or by planting a hedge around the plot.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Pruning

Moringa should be trimmed to promote branching, increase yields, and facilitate harvesting. If left to grow without cutting the main trunk, the fast-growing tree will grow straight and tall producing leaves and pods only on the primary stem. To encourage the development of many branches and pods within easy reach from the ground, prune the apical growing shoot when the tree is 1.0–2.0 m high. Use a sharp cutting knife, machete, or pruning saw to make smooth cuts. New shoots will emerge from just below where the cut is made. Thereafter, cut the growing tips of the branches so that the tree will become bushier. Another pruning strategy is to cut back each branch by 30 cm when it reaches 60 cm in length. This will produce a multibranched shrub.

If the tree is being grown for pod production, remove flowers during the first year. This will channel all of the young tree’s energy into vegetative and root development (rather than energy- draining pods), leading to more vigorous growth and productive yields in the future, to making dried leaf powder, since stems can be removed during the sifting process.

For fresh vegetables, tie harvested leaves in bundles and place them under shade to maintain freshness. Moringa leaves can easily lose moisture after harvesting, therefore, harvest early in the morning and sell the same day, if possible.

The leaflets can also be dried in the sun for a few hours and then stored for consumption during the hot-wet season, a time when minerals and vitamins are most lacking in diets.

Flowers and pods are normally produced during the second year of growth. Harvest pods when they are young, tender, and green. They are eaten as green beans. Older pods are fibrous and develop a tough shell, but their pulp and immature seeds remain edible until shortly before the ripening process begins. Immature seeds can be used in recipes similar to green peas. Fresh or dried flowers are used for making teas.

Older trees that are unproductive or too high for easy harvesting can be pruned at ground level. New shoots will emerge quickly from the base.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Harvesting

Leaves can be harvested after plants grow 1.5–2.0 m, which usually takes at least one year. Harvest leaves by snapping leaf stems from branches. Harvesting young shoot tips will promote development of side branches where cuts along the main branches are made. Allow plants to develop new shoots and branches before subsequent harvests. If plants are grown at closer spacing and higher density, cut plants about 10–20 cm above ground.

Older leaves will need to be stripped from their tough and wiry stems. These leaves are more suited

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Collecting and storing ripe Moringa seeds

Mature pods contain ripe seeds that are used for planting the next crop or for extracting oil. When producing seed for oil extraction, allow the pods to dry and turn brown on the tree. Harvest pods be- fore they split open and fall to the ground. Store seeds in well-ventilated sacks in a cool, dry, and shaded area. Seeds remain viable for planting for two years.

Reference www.avrdc.org

Moringa is the source of incredible health benefits.

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Moringa – A Multivitamin Shot!

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Moringa Support

Mar 16, 16
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The powerful benefits of Zija have been validated with hundreds of thousands of positive individual experiences. To maximize Moringa’s remarkable health benefits, Zija enlisted the help of Dr. Joshua Plant, Biomedical Scientist. Moringa is changing lives every day, and we are positioned to deliver it to the world like never before!

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1 lb. Organic Moringa Oleifera Leaf Powder. 100% Pure USDA Certified. All Natural Energy Boost, Raw Superfood and Multi-Vitamin Tea Leaves. No GMO, Gluten Free. Great in Green Drinks, Smoothies.

Mar 06, 16
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WHY USE MORINGA?

• Benefit from ingredients that offer a natural caffeine-free energy boost and promote overall health and wellness.
• Add a little moringa powder to your shake or smoothie every day for a color and nutrient boost.
• Enjoy a Vegetarian Source of Iron. With much more iron than spinach, Moringa is a great natural way to boost iron without meat.
• Help with Digestion. Taken in small does, Moringa can help maintain healthy digestive tract.
• Highly Bioavailable. Moringa is ‘cell ready’ (easily absorbed by the body) ensuring you get more of its goodness.

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