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Top 20 Health Benefits of Moringa Oliefera

Jun 03, 16
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  1. Moringa offers excellent nutritional support

Having a Moringa tree in the garden is sufficient to meet the nutritional requirements of the entire household. The leaves have the highest score in this regard. Moringa leaves are an excellent calcium source and a storehouse of many other minerals and vitamins. 100 grams of dry Moringa leaves contain 17 times more of calcium than milk and 25 times more iron than spinach. Their beta-carotene content is 10 times more than carrots. They are rich in minerals like potassium, iron and zinc and in Vitamin C and B-complex vitamins.

Moringa leaves are surprisingly rich in protein too, containing 4 times of what eggs provide. There are 2 grams of protein in every cup of fresh Moringa leaves. Although most vegetable sources of protein are considered inferior to animal sources, Moringa has the advantage of containing all the essential amino acids, making it a complete protein.

  1. Moringa extract lowers serum cholesterol

Mainstream medicine is starting to recognize some of the health benefits of Moringa, one among them being its capacity to reduce cholesterol.  Many traditional medicine systems of Asia have been using the extract of Moringa leaves and root as heart tonics. These herbal preparations have been shown to reduce serum cholesterol and the formation of atherosclerotic plaques.

Laboratory studies in rabbits have shown 50% reduction of serum cholesterol and 86% reduction of atherosclerotic plaque formation in 12 weeks of administering Moringa extract.

  1. Moringa leaves help to control blood sugar

Eating a tablespoon of lightly toasted Moringa leaves early in the morning is a traditional herbal remedy for hyperglycemia. Recent laboratory studies using leaf powder on diabetic animals show that this is indeed helpful in regulating blood sugar. The beneficial effect is partially attributed to the fiber content, but the quercetin-3-glucoside in Moringa as well the isothiocyanates and chlorogenic acid could be playing an important role.

Small-scale studies on diabetic people have shown promise with just 7 grams of Moringa leaves in powder form taken for a period of 3 months. 50 grams of fresh leaves as part of normal diet has been found to significantly reduce blood sugar spikes after the meal.

  1. Moringa may help fight various types of cancers

The anti-cancer arsenal of moringa is impressive. Besides antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E, it contains kaempferol, quercetin, and rhamnetin. Since cancerous growths are triggered by free radical damage at the cellular level, it is not surprising that Moringa should have an anti-cancer effect. Lab tests have proven that it has a beneficial action against liver, lung, ovarian and skin cancers. While more studies are being done to assess the clinical significance of these findings, it doesn’t hurt to include more Moringa in our diet or use just 7 grams of leaf powder (1 ½ teaspoons) (available to buy from this page on Amazon) as a nutritional supplement.

  1. Moringa reduces inflammation in the body

The inflammatory response to injuries is an integral part of the natural healing mechanism of the body, but chronic inflammation, probably resulting from the damage inflicted by free radicals, can have an adverse effect on our metabolic system. Heart disease and metabolic disorders like insulin resistance and diabetes are thought to be the result of chronic inflammation.

Not only the leaves of Moringa, but its fruits and flowers used as a vegetable as well as the extract of its seeds, have anti-inflammatory action. Including them in your diet or in the form supplements may help ward off these disease conditions.

  1. Moringa leaves and drumsticks provide energy boost

Our body is in constant need of energy just to function normally. The energy requirements of our body for the growth and repair of tissues are met by the food we eat, but as we age, our body faces more cellular damage and becomes less efficient in the regenerative process. This makes us tired and listless. We often depend on energy boosters like caffeine, but they only provide temporary spurts. Besides, we tend to need ever increasing doses to get the same effect.

Moringa has a heavy load of antioxidants to reduce cell damage. It also contains high amounts of vitamin, minerals, and most importantly, all the essential amino acids required for the repair and regeneration of tissues. This highly nutritious, wholesome food can provide lasting energy boost.

  1. Moringa improves immune function

Including Moringa leaves and fruit in the diet helps increase immunity and offers protection against seasonal ailments. In India, Moringa leaves are usually added to lentil soups during the cold and flu season to increase disease resistance. This practice is a lifesaver in poor communities where people live in crowded, unsanitary conditions with little or no access to medical facilities. Moringa leaves are part of the herbal supplement given to HIV+ve patients as an adjuvant to anti-retroviral therapy.

  1. Moringa leaves promote weight loss

People taking Moringa leaf extract and leaf powder often report weight loss. This beneficial effect could be due to many factors. The anti-inflammatory and diuretic effect helps reduce water retention. The high fiber content reduces fat absorption in the gut. The reduction in insulin resistance may prevent excess fat accumulation.

  1. Moringa is useful for treating gastrointestinal problems

Adding a handful of Moringa leaves to soups and vegetable dishes is the best way to keep things moving. Moringa leaves have a mild laxative effect. The high fiber content facilitates easy movement of stomach contents along the digestive tract and relieves constipation. Moringa can take care of minor digestive problems caused by gastrointestinal worms and microbes. The root extract is an herbal remedy for helminth worms.

  1. Moringa leaves increase breast milk in lactating mothers

Of all the health benefits of Moringa, this is one of the most appreciated in Indian communities, especially in economically weaker sections, because breast milk is the mainstay of infants in the first year of life. Moringa leaves toasted in a spoonful of butter would be given every day to lactating mothers as part of traditional postpartum care. If any ailments or general fatigue causes a decrease in breast milk production in the following months, Moringa leaves are added to the diet again. This ensures not only plenty of milk supply but good weight gain and robust health for the infant.

The high calcium content of Moringa leaves could be an obvious reason for the increased breast milk production, but there could be more to it than that. For instance, the effect of calcium supplements comes nowhere near the copious milk production resulting from the use of Moringa leaves.

  1. Moringa root can improve kidney function

The Moringa tree is also known as horseradish tree because a spicy condiment similar to horseradish sauce can be prepared from its root. However, the active compounds found in the leaves occur in the root at much higher concentrations; hence, it is mainly used for medicinal purposes. The diuretic and detoxifying properties of Moringa root extract help improve kidney function and resolve urinary tract infections.

Moringa root extract is used to treat kidney stones since it helps flush out excess calcium from the kidneys. While helping to expel the stones, it can reduce the associated pain and inflammation too.

  1. Moringa regulates thyroid function

Moringa seems to be having a regulatory action on the thyroid gland. For example, people with Grave’s disease or overactive thyroid find significant improvement in their symptoms on regular use of Moringa supplements. Inflammatory conditions of the thyroid such as Hashimoto’s disease could be resolved without medication if Moringa is consumed regularly.

  1. Provides relief from rheumatoid arthritis

Moringa has immune-modulating properties that are particularly useful in treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and psoriasis. Many herbal preparations for arthritis include Moringa leaves. The anti-inflammatory effect reduces the pain and swelling of the joints.

  1. Gives relief from insomnia

Including Moringa leaves and drumsticks in the diet is known to improve sleep. Taking Moringa extract or leaf powder may be just as effective. The amino acid tryptophan found in appreciable amounts in Moringa could be a contributing factor. It is essential for the production of the neurotransmitter serotonin and the sleep cycle regulating hormone melatonin. Vitamin B6 is another necessary player in serotonin production, and Moringa is rich in that too.

  1. Moringa stimulates hair growth

The abundance of Zinc, and Vitamins A, and E, as well as the amino acids required for the production of keratin, makes Moringa an excellent hair tonic.

Moringa seeds have very high fat content. The oil extracted from the seeds is known as Ben oil, and it forms 40% of the seed. This edible oil is odorless with a light texture and sweet taste. A unique feature of this oil is its stability and resistance to oxidation. The main component of Ben oil is a saturated fat called behenic acid, which does not become rancid on keeping, unlike most vegetable oils. This expensive oil is used in many high-quality skin and hair care products.

Moringa seed oil improves blood circulation in the scalp and stimulates hair growth. However, on account of it being very expensive, traditional herbal remedies employ seed powder instead. Taking Moringa supplements is very effective too, as they supply the minerals and B complex vitamins that are important for hair growth.

  1. Reduces dandruff and other scalp problems

The light texture of Ben oil helps with absorption and is highly moisturizing. It promotes blood circulation and regulates the oil glands in the hair follicles, improving overall scalp health. Application of the oil as well as the seed extract is found to be effective in controlling dandruff and hair loss.

  1. Controls skin wrinkles and fine lines

The Ben oil pressed from the seeds of the Moringa tree has a long history of being used as a skin detoxifier and wrinkle remover. The Egyptians used it in cosmetic preparations as an anti-aging emollient as early as 1400 BC. Rich in vitamins A, C and E, and a number of B complex vitamins as well, it is no surprise that the oil has excellent antioxidant property.

Antioxidants reduce the cell damage and aging caused by free radicals and help maintain the smoothness and youthful appearance of the skin. Apply a few drops on the face and hands and gently massage it in. The light consistency of the Moringa seed oil makes it a natural cleanser and moisturizer without making the skin oily.

  1. Reduces acne and blackheads

Ben oil helps in reducing common skin complaints such as acne and blackheads that arise from imbalances in oil secretion by skin glands. They are often worsened by bacterial and fungal infections. Massage the oil on the face and allow it to be absorbed by the skin pores. The light nature of the oil unclogs the pores and lifts up the dirt and debris.

Besides the cleansing action of the oil, its antiseptic property reduces bacterial overload in the hair follicles, while the anti-inflammatory effect prevents inflammatory acne that usually require antibiotic treatments. Long-term use of topical antibiotics is known to cause acne flare-ups resulting from increased bacterial resistance, but no such adverse effect has been observed with regular use of Ben oil.

  1. Moringa helps control eczema and psoriasis

Moringa oil and extracts have an ameliorating effect on skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. The oil is non-irritating and moisturizing. The anti-inflammatory substances in Moringa help control inflammation while the antiseptic effect protects the skin from secondary infections that exacerbate these conditions.

  1. There is an old saying: “Moringa leaves prevent 300 diseases.” Now modern science is proving that these tiny leaves are packed with incredible nutrition that can strengthen our bodies and prevent many diseases.arrow-down-green851140459de5ac0eb2b9e231eabceea9arrow-down-green
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Moringa Tree Combats Malnutrition Worldwide

Jun 01, 16
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 Moringa-1a

Moringa Trees can be found in the tropics, world wide. It also thrives in the arid parts of the world where bad water, poor diet, and the diseases are leading killers. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that nearly 80% of the world’s population relies on traditional medicine (the use of plants) for their primary healthcare. Since the Moringa Tree is already common in much of the developing world, it can meet the needs of local populations in terms of availability, accessibility, and utilization. It is already growing in areas of need, with spontaneous growth in many regions, and is a hearty and drought tolerant plant. Unlike imported medicine, foods, or other supplements, the low cost of the Moringa Tree makes it affordable to poor populations. Its potential as a cheap local supplement in the fight against malnutrition is promising. Many humanitarian organizations including the Church World Service, the Educational Concerns for Hunger Organizations, Trees for Life, and the National Science Foundation now promote the use of Moringa in poverty-stricken areas to combat malnutrition.

Amadou Ba, director of a Senegalese village health post states, “We were all trained in the classic solutions for treating malnutrition– whole milk powder, sugar, vegetable oil, sometimes peanut butter. But these ingredients are expensive and the recovery of malnourished infants can take months. Now we have replaced this with Moringa. We start seeing improvements within 10 days.”

Combats Childhood Blindness

Lack of vitamin A (due to malnutrition) causes 70% of childhood blindness around the world. 500,000 children are going blind every year due to lack of vitamin A. The Bethesda, Maryland based International Eye Foundation, is using Moringa with its high content of beta carotene, which is converted to vitamin A by the body, to combat childhood blindness around the world.

Purifies Water

Lack of drinkable water is one of the world’s most serious threats. Water related diseases account for more than 80% of the world’s sickness. People in many developing nations simply do not have acess to clean safe water. They are left with no choice but to drink and wash with water so contaminated that we wouldn’t even dare to walk in it.

Professor Suleyman Aremu Muyibi, of the International Islamic University of Malaysia, believes Moringa seeds could potentially provide a renewable, sustainable and biodegradable material for treating global water supplies. When Moringa seeds are crushed and added to dirty, bacteria laden water, they purify the water. As part of a Nigeria-based study, Muyibi feels that such an opportunity could be especially attractive in developing countries, where roughly 1.2 billion people still lack safe drinking water, with an estimated 25,000 people dying from water-borne diseases every day.

Britain’s University of Leicester is also studying the coagulating properties of Moringa seeds for its water purifying abilities. Researchers believe the Moringa seeds would work better than the common water purifier, aluminum sulfate, which can be toxic, and have successfully replaced the imported alum system of a Malawi village with a simpler full scale system using Moringa seeds.

Related News Article:  Moringa Leaves Saving Lives in DRC

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All Things Moringa Review

Apr 13, 16
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 “All Things Moringa”

The Story of an Amazing Tree of Life Contents Introduction Vitamin Mineral Content of Moringa Amino Acid Content of Moringa The Moringa.

Here’s a sample of the 1st 6 of 42 pages

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The Magical Moringa By: Vanita Agarwal

Apr 13, 16
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Full Review of Moringa Oleifera from the California College of Ayurveda Medicine

Introduction

Growing up in India this humble tree grew in our backyard and it never caught my attention, though I always loved the vegetable that grew on it. As I  entered into the world of Ayurveda I learnt about  this most  nutritious  tree  in the world called Moringa  only to realize that this tree was a childhood friend that I had loved and this world famous Moringa was my backyard fried the drumstick tree or Sajana as we used to call it.

In this paper I will attempt to cover:

  • 1. What is Moringa?
  • 2. The Nutritional value of Moringa
  • 3. Johns Hopkins University research on Moringa
  • 4. Health benefits of Moringa
  • 5. The qualities of Moringa from an Ayurvedic perspective

1. What is Moringa?

According to Wikipedia Moringa, a native to parts of Africa and Asia, is the sole genus in the flowering plant family Moringaceae. The name is derived from the Tamil word Murungai (முருங்கை) [1].

It contains 13 species from tropical and subtropical climates that range in size from tiny herbs to massive trees. The most widely cultivated species is Moringa oleifera, a multipurpose tree native to the foothills of the Himalayas in northwestern India and cultivated throughout the tropics. M. stenopetala, an African species, is also widely grown, but to a much lesser extent than M. oleifera.

As Moringa spread from India to other tropical and subtropical areas, it adapted to local conditions. Over time, these thirteen distinct species of Moringa developed.

Scientific Classification of Moringa [1]:

Kingdom:         Plantae

(un-ranked): Angiosperms

(un-ranked): Eudicots

(un-ranked): Rosids

Order: Brassicales

Family: Moringaceae

Genus: Moringa

Scientific Names of the 13 different species of Moringa found in the world today [1]

  1. M. oleifera (Northwestern India)
  2. M. arborea (Kenya)
  3. M. borziana
  4. M. concanensis
  5. M. drouhardii (Southwestern Madagascar)
  6. M. hildebrandtii
  7. M. longituba
  8. M. ovalifolia
  9. M. peregrine
  10. M. pygmaea
  11. M. rivae
  12. M. ruspoliana
  13. M. stenopetala

Common Names of Moringa:

While native to the Indian sub-continent, Moringa has spread throughout the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. There are over 400 names of Moringa around different parts of the world. Here are some of the many common names of Moringa: [3]

English Drumstick tree, Horseradish tree, Mother’s Best Friend, Radish tree, West Indian ben
French Bèn ailé, Benzolive, Moringa, Ben oléifère, Arbre radis du cheval
German Behenbaum, Behenussbaum, Flügelsaniger Bennussbaum, Pferderettichbaum
Italian Sàndalo ceruleo
Portuguese Acácia branca, Cedra (Brazil), Marungo, Moringuiero, Muringa
Spanish  Árbol del ben, Ben, Morango, Moringa

Africa

Benin: Patima, Ewé ilé

Burkina Faso: Argentiga

Cameroon: Paizlava, Djihiré

Chad: Kag n’dongue

Ethiopia: Aleko, Haleko

Ghana: Yevu-ti, Zingerindende

Kenya: Mronge

Malawi: Cham’mwanba

Mali: Névrédé

Niger: Zôgla gandi

Nigeria: Ewe ile, Bagaruwar maka

Senegal: Neverday, Sap-Sap

Somalia: Dangap

Sudan: Ruwag

Tanzania: Mlonge

Togo: Baganlua, Yovovoti

Zimbabwe: Mupulanga

Asia

Bangladesh: Sajina

Burma: Dandalonbin

Cambodia: Ben ailé

India: Sahjan, Murunga, Moonga;

Hindi: Sahijan, Munaga, Sajana,

Sindhi: Swanjera

Tamil: Murungai, Murunkak-kai, Morunga

Telegu: Tella-Munaga, Mulaga, Sajana

Kannada: Nugge mara, Nugge kayi;

Oriya: Munigha, Sajina

Punjabi: Sanjina, Soanjana

Rajasthani: Lal Sahinjano

Sanskrit: Sigru Shobhanjan, Sobhan jana, Shobanjana

Konkani/Goa: Moosing, Mosing

Malayalam: Sigru, Moringa, Muringa, Murinna, Morunna

Marathi: Sujna, Shevga, Shivga

Indonesia: Kalor

Pakistan: Suhanjna

Philippines: Mulangai

Sri Lanka: Murunga

Taiwan: La Mu

Thailand: Marum

Vietnam: Chùm Ngây

South and Central America, Caribbean

Brazil: Cedro

Colombia: Angela

Costa Rica: Marango

Cuba: Palo Jeringa

Dominican Republic: Palo de aceiti

El Salvador: Teberinto

French Guiana: Saijhan

Guadeloupe: Moloko

Guatemala: Perlas

Haiti: Benzolive

Honduras: Maranga calalu

Nicaragua: Marango

Panama: Jacinto

Puerto Rico: Resada

Suriname: Kelor

Trinidad: Saijan

Oceania

Fiji: Sajina

Guam: Katdes

Palau: Malungkai

2. The Nutritional value of Moringa

The tree is often referred to as “The Miracle Tree” and “Mother’s Best Friend”, which is understandable when you learn that Moringa contains a unique combination of vitamins, minerals and amino acids that make it one of the most nutritious plants ever discovered. Much of the plant is edible by humans or by farm animals.

Moringa leaves

Moringa leaves are exceptionally nutritious. When fresh, they are rich in vitamin C. When carefully dried, gram for gram Moringa leaves contain 24 times the iron of spinach, 16 times the calcium of milk, 9 times the vitamin A of carrots, many times the potassium of bananas, and every essential amino acid your body needs.

The leaves are rich in protein, vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin C and minerals [4]. 100g of fresh Moringa leaves have 8.3 g protein, 434 mg calcium, 404 mg potassium, 738 μg vitamin A, and 164 mg vitamin C [5].

 

Antioxidants

Moringa contains 46 powerful antioxidants – compounds that protect the body against the destructive effects of free radicals by neutralizing them before they can cause cellular damage and disease [6].

 

Vitamins

Vitamin A (Alpha & Beta-Carotene), B, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, D, E, K, Folate (Folic Acid), Biotin [6]

 

Minerals

Calcium, Chromium, Copper, Fluorine, Iron, Manganese, Magnesium, Molybdenum, Phosphorus, Potassium, Sodium, Selenium, Sulphur, Zinc [6] .

 

Essential Amino acids

Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, Threonine, Tryptophan, Valine [6].

 

Non-essential Amino Acids

Alanine, Arginine, Aspartic Acid, Cystine, Glutamine, Gl ycine, Histidine, Proline, Serine, Tyrosine [6]

Vitamin & Mineral Content of Moringa: [9]

All values are per 100 grams of edible portion.

Fresh Leaves Dried Leaves
Carotene (Vit. A)* 6.78 mg 18.9 mg
Thiamin (B1) 0.06 mg 2.64 mg
Riboflavin (B2) 0.05 mg 20.5 mg
Niacin (B3) 0.8 mg 8.2 mg
Vitamin C 220 mg 17.3 mg
Calcium 440 mg 2,003 mg
Calories 92 cal 205 cal
Carbohydrates 12.5 g 38.2 g
Copper 0.07 mg 0.57 mg
Fat 1.70 g 2.3 g
Fiber 0.90 g 19.2 g
Iron 0.85 mg 28.2 mg
Magnesium 42 mg 368 mg
Phosphorus 70 mg 204 mg
Potassium 259 mg 1,324 mg
Protein 6.70 g 27.1g
Zinc 0.16 mg 3.29 mg

Amino Acid Content of Moringa [9]:

All values are per 100 grams of edible portion.

Fresh Leaves Dried Leaves
Arginine 406.6 mg 1,325 mg
Histidine 149.8 mg 613 mg
Isoleucine 299.6 mg 825 mg
Leucine 492.2 mg 1,950 mg
Lysine 342.4 mg 1,325 mg
Methionine 117.7 mg 350 mg
Phenylalinine 310.3 mg 1,388 mg
Threonine 117.7 mg 1,188 mg
Tryptophan 107 mg 425 mg
Valine 374.5 mg 1,063 mg

3. Johns Hopkins University research on Moringa [10] :

Jed W. Fahey, Sc.D. , Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences produced a very important research paper titled: “Moringa oleifera: A Review of the Medical Evidence for Its Nutritional, Therapeutic, and Prophylactic Properties. Part 1.” In this seminal work, they began the process of sifting through the scientific work on Moringa, as well as the traditional, as well as anecdotal evidence for Moringa’s nutritional, therapeutic and prophylactic. In doing this, they found that much of the scientific evidence is beginning to support much of the traditional and anecdotal information.

4. Health Benefits of Moringa

Moringa preparations have been cited in the scientific literature as having antibiotic, antitrypanosomal, hypotensive, antispasmodic, antiulcer, anti-inflammatory, hypo-cholesterolemic, and hypoglycemic activities, as well as having considerable efficacy in water purification by flocculation, sedimentation, antibiosis and even reduction of Schistosome cercariae titer.

Antibiotic Activity: This is clearly the area in which the preponderance evidence—both classical scientific and extensive anecdotal evidence—is overwhelming. The scientific evidence has now been available for over 50 years, although much of it is completely unknown to western scientists [10].

Phytochemicals and 6 Carbon Sugar Rhamnose: An examination of the phytochemicals of Moringa species affords the opportunity to examine a range of fairly unique compounds. In particular, this plant family is rich in compounds containing the simple sugar, rhamnose, and it is rich in a fairly unique group of compounds called glucosinolates and isothiocyanates. For example, specific components of Moringa preparations that have been reported to have hypotensive, anticancer, and antibacterial activity [10].

Antibacterial and Antifungal:

Subsequent elegant and very thorough work, published in 1964 as a PhD thesis by Bennie Badgett (a student of the well-known chemist Martin Ettlinger), identified a number of glycosylated derivatives of benzyl isothiocyanate [5] (e.g. compounds containing the 6-carbon simple sugar, rhamnose) (8). The identity of these compounds was not available in the refereed scientific literature until “re-discovered” 15 years later by Kjaer and co-workers (73). Seminal reports on the antibiotic activity of the primary rhamnosylated compound then followed, from U Eilert and colleagues in Braunschweig, Germany (33, 34). They re-isolated and confirmed the identity of 4-(α-L-rhamnopy-ranosyloxy)benzyl glucosinolate [6] and its cognate isothiocyanate [2] and verified the activity of the latter compound against a wide range of bacteria and fungi. (Jed W. Fahey, 2005) This is clearly the area in which the preponderance of evidence—both classical scientific and extensive anecdotal evidence—is overwhelming. The scientific evidence has now been available for over 50 years, although much of it is completely unknown to western scientists [10].

ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF MORINGA STENOPETALA [12]

The main objective of this study was to isolate compounds from root wood of Moringa stenopetala and evaluate antibacterial activities of the isolated compounds. Three of the compounds namely cholest-5-en-3-ol, palmitic acid and oleic acid showed highest activity against E. coli. The observed antibacterial activities of the crude extract and the isolated compounds could justify the traditional use of the plant for the treatment of different bacterial infections [12].

  1. pylori is an omnipresent pathogen of human beings in medically underserved areas of the world, and amongst the poorest of poor populations worldwide. It is a major cause of gastritis, and of gastric and duodenal ulcers, and it is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (having been classified as a carcinogen by the W.H.O. in 1993). Cultures of H. pylori, it turned out, were extraordinarily susceptible to [2], and to a number of other isothiocyanates (37, 60). These compounds had antibiotic activity against H. pylori at concentrations up to 1000-fold lower than those which had been used in earlier studies against a wide range of bacteria and fungi. The extension of this finding to human H. pylori infection is now being pursued in the clinic, and the prototypical isothiocyanate has already demonstrated some efficacy in pilot studies [10].

Cancer Prevention:

Since Moringa species have long been recognized by folk medicine practitioners as having value in tumor therapy, we examined compounds for their cancer preventive potential. Recently, these compounds were shown to be potent inhibitors of phorbol ester (TPA)-induced Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation in lymphoblastoid (Burkitt’s lymphoma) cells [10].

In one of these studies, they also inhibited tumor promotion in a mouse two-stage DMBA-TPA tumor model. In an even more recent study, Bharali and colleagues have examined skin tumor prevention following ingestion of drumstick (Moringa seedpod) extracts. In this mouse model, which included appropriate positive and negative controls, a dramatic reduction in skin papillomas was demonstrated. Thus, traditional practice has long suggested that cancer prevention and therapy may be achievable with native plants.

Role of Moringa on Gastric Ulcer and its use as Antacid

  • • A study on Moringa leaf extract to determine its effect on experimental gastric ulceration concluded that the leaf extract can be beneficially used in the management of gastric ulcer in contrast to the classical antacid, antihistamine or surgical treatment [13].
  • • Two weeks of treatment with Moringa Oleifera healed gastric ulcer damage [14].

Role of Moringa on Muscle cramps and Sleep

  • • Moringa is found to significantly reduces muscle cramps, decreases body temperature, and enhances sleep [15].

Benefits to Heart, Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Atherosclerotic Plaques:

  • • Moringa has been found to have significant benefits to heart [16]. Water extract of Moringa Oleifera leaves possesses strong antioxidant activities. The prevention of artherosclerotic plaque formation in artery as well as the lipid lowering activity of the extract has been shown in rabbit fed with high cholesterol diet. M. Oleifera has high therapeutic potential for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.
  • • It works as well as Simvastatin in decreasing cholesterol, triglycerides, and inhibiting the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. [17]
  • • Moringa strengthens heart function : Prevented structural damage and prevented increases in lipid peroxidation in the myocardium [8]

Anti-fungal

  • • Moringa seeds have shown anti-fungal ability and effectiveness against athlete’s foot [18].

Prevention of Kidney stone

  • • Moringa water extract has shown to prevent kidney stone formation and dissolve already performed stones [19].

Liver fibrosis

Oral administration of Moringa seed extract in rats reduced liver damage as well as symptoms of liver fibrosis. Moringa seed extract can act against CCl(4)-induced liver injury and fibrosis in rats by a mechanism related to its antioxidant properties, anti-inflammatory effect and its ability to attenuate the hepatic stellate cells activation. [20]

Cancer/Chemo preventative property of Moringa

  • • A study was conducted to find out the Chemomodulatory effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Moringa oleifera, Lam, on hepatic carcinogen metabolizing enzymes, antioxidant parameters and skin papillomagenesis in mice. The findings are suggestive of a possible chemo preventive potential of Moringa oliefera drumstick extract against chemical carcinogenesis [21]

Blood glucose level and Diabetes

  • • Variable doses of M. oleifera leaves aqueous extract administered orally to test the glycemic control, haemoglobin, total protein, urine sugar, urine protein and body weight. The dose of 200 mg kg(-1) decreases blood glucose level (BGL) of normal animals by 26.7 and 29.9% during FBG and OGTT studies respectively. In sub and mild diabetic animals the same dose produced a maximum fall of 31.1 and 32.8% respectively, during OGTT. In case of severely diabetic animals FBG and PPG levels were reduced by 69.2 and 51.2% whereas, total protein, body weight and haemoglobin were increased by 11.3, 10.5 and 10.9% respectively after 21 days of treatment. Significant reduction was found in urine sugar and urine protein levels from +4 and +2 to nil and trace, respectively. The test result concluded that the study validates scientifically the widely claimed use of M. oleifera as an ethnomedicine to treat diabetes mellitus. [22]

5.  Ayurvedic Perspective on Moringa

According to Vaidya Mishra [23] , an Ayurvedic expert from the Shankha Vamsa lineage, Moringa is  both a  detoxifier as well as a tonic. Whenever we detox we also use a tonic, Moringa does both. It purifies and nourishes the blood and muscle tissues, the bone marrow and the fat tissues of any toxins at the same time nourishing it.

Ayurvedic Properties/Guna of Moringa

Taste (rasa) Pungent/katu, tikta/bitter
Virya Heating/ushna
Post Digestive metabolic state (vipak): pungent/katu
Guna Light/laghu, dry/ruksha, sharp/tikshana, fluid/sara
Prabhava • Liver cleanser (yakrit sodhana)
• Purifies Blood (rakta sodhaka)
• enhances spleen/pliha
• Removes worms (krmi), acidic toxins from the blood (amavishagni)
• Relieves from tumor (gulma)
• Strengthens heart/ hridya, fat metabolism and weight loss/Medovishahara and regulates cholesterol.

In Bhava Prakash (16 Century canonical textbook of Ayurveda), part one, authored by Bhav Mishra and Rajnigantu, Moringa is called sigru, or “it moves like an arrow” in the body because it rapidly penetrates the tissues and has deep absorption and detoxification ability, making its effect on the deep bone marrow tissue swift and effective.

The Nature and Qualities of Moringa:

  • • Hot and sharp, but also bitter and pungent
  • • Pacifies vata and kapha (vatakaphapaha)
  • • Pacifies kledaka kapha and increases appetite
  • • Reduces stiffness in the jaw, relaxes the jaw and thus helps in opening the mouth (mukhajadyahar)
  • • It is appetizing (rucyo)
  • • Increases digestive flame (dipano)
  • • It cleans and clears the ulcers (vranadosanut). Vrana means ulcer.
  • • Bitter (Sigrustiktah)
  • • Pungent and heating (Katuscosnah)
  • • Reduces kapha-predominant swelling and water retention, which can also lead to vata imbalance. Swollen ankles are a common complication of excess weight. Three-four drumstick pods per meal begin to reintroduce the intelligence so the body does not accumulate toxins in the lower extremities. Over time, little by little, the swelling will go down and not return. (Kaphasophasamirajit)
  • • Creates an unfriendly environment for the growth of tumors
  • • Destroys krimi and amavisha (Krgyamvisa)
  • • By binding the toxins in the blood, and cleaning the blood (due to its hot potency and pungent taste and post digestive taste), it relieves long term burning in the skin and stomach.
  • • Prevents and rids the tumors. When the clean blood circulates, growth of tumors are prevented and also if tumors are present, gets rid of the tumors (gulmanut).
  • • The Ayurvedic verse on Moringa by Bhav prakash of Bhav Mishra cites Moringa as removing acidic toxins from the blood, cleansing the blood. This in turn lowers bad cholesterol and improves cholesterol metabolism. This correlates the power of Moringa in lowering bad cholesterol and improving cholesterol metabolism.
  • • Kidney Stones: Ushna/hot and thikshana/pungent quality of Moringa stimulates the kidneys, dysuria, increases quantity of urine, removes excess acidity in urine and calculi.

Dr. JV Hebbar, summarizes several interesting facts about Moringa in his blog [24].

Sanskrit Synonyms:

  • • Shobhanjana – Very auspicious tree
  • • Shigru – has strong, piercing qualities
  • • Teekshnagandha – Strong and pungent odor
  • • Aksheeva – relieves intoxication
  • • Mochaka – helps to cure diseases

Classical categorization:

  • According to Charaka Samhita
  • Krimighna – group of herbs that are used to treat worm infestation.
  • Svedopaga – group of herbs that are used in Svedana (preparatory procedure for Panchakarma)
  • Shirovirechanopaga – group of herbs that are used in Nasya Panchakarma treatment
  • Katuka Skandha – group of herbs that have pungent taste.
  • According to Sushruta and Vagbhata – Varunadi Group of herbs. (Hence it is an ingredient of a famous Ayurvedic medicine – Varanadi kashayam)

Medicinal Qualities of drumstick tree:

  • Rasa(taste) – Katu (Pungent), Tikta (bitter)
  • Guna(qualities) – Laghu (light to digest), Rooksha (dryness), Teekshna (strong, piercing)
  • Vipaka – katu (Moringa undergoes pungent taste conversion after digestion.)
  • Veerya – Ushna – hot potency.
  • Effect on Tridosha – Balances Kapha and Vata

Varieties of Moringa:

There are three varieties of Moringa explained in Ayurvedic text books.

  1. Shyama – black variety
  2. Shveta – white variety and
  3. Rakta – red variety. It is also called as Madhu shigru.

Black variety of drumstick tree is the most common. Its qualities are:

Katu – pungent,

Teekshna – piercing, sharp, strong

Ushna – hot in potency

Madhura – slightly sweetish

Laghu – light to digest

Deepana – improves digestion

Rochana – Improves taste,

Rooksha – dry

Kshara – Has alkaline properties

Tikta – Bitter

Vidaahakrit – causes burning sensation

Sangrahi – Useful to check diarrhoea

Shukrala – Improves semen quantity and sperm count

Hrudya – Good for heart. Cardiac tonic

Pittarakta prakopana: Increases Pitta and vitiates blood. Hence, drumstick should not be consumed during bleeding disorders, duriner menstruation and for people with pimples and Pitta related skin diseases.

Chakshushya – Improves vision, good for eyes.

Kaphavataghna – Decreases imbalanced Kapha and Vata

Vidradhi – Useful in abscess. It helps in quick wound healing of abscess, upon oral intake and external application as paste.

Shvayathu – It is a good anti inflammatory herb.

Krimi – useful in worm infestation in stomach and in wounds.

Meda – helpful to decrease fat and obesity.

Apachi – Useful in relieving carbuncles.

Visha – Anti toxic. Has detoxifying action.

Pleeha – Useful in spleen related diseases

Gulma – Useful in abdominal bloating and tumors

Ganda Vrana – Useful in lymphadenitis

White variety Moringa Properties: It is quite similar to the black variety.

Dahakrut – causes burning sensation

pleehaanaam vidradhim hanti – useful in splenic abscess

VraNaghna – helps in quick wound healing

Pittaraktakrut – Increases Pitta and vitiates blood.

 

The Red Variety, called as Madhushigru

Deepana – Increases digestion power.

Sara – promotes proper bowel movements.

Moringa Leaves and Bark

The juice extract of drumstick leaves and bark are very useful in relieving pain. They act as natural analgesic. They are used both for oral intake and also for external application as paste.

In Indian household, the leaves are used to prepare Chutney and Sambar (a south-indian soup).

Moringa seeds uses: Moringa seeds are called as Shweta Maricha

Chakshushya – good for eyes

Vishanashana – anti toxic

Avrushya – do not have aphrodisiac qualities

Nasyena Shiro Artinut – When used for Nasya (in the form of powder or oil), it helps to relieve headache.

 

Moringa for Headaches:

Moringa leaves paste applied externally, or used as vegetable helps to relieve headache.

Its seed powder, in the form of nasya treatment cures headache.

 

Moringa for Diabetes: Many studies have been conducted to prove the anti-diabetic and anti-oxidant effect of Moringa.

Oil prepared with Moringa is useful to relieve headache, pungent, useful in skin diseases and diabetes.

Moringa flowers are useful in intestinal worms. It balances Pitta and kapha.

Moringa Side Effects:

As explained above, it causes increase in burning sensation and is pungent. Hence, people with gastritis or sensitive stomach should use this vegetable carefully.

It is not ideal to be taken during periods, since it increases Pitta and vitiates blood.

It is also not ideal to be taken during bleeding disorders.

 

Moringa during pregnancy and lactation:

Moringa fruit is rich in protein, vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidants. Hence it can be used during pregnancy. But Moringa leaves, root bark and flowers are not indicated during pregnancy.

 

Conclusion:

Thus we can see that this humble tree is loaded with wonderful qualities that can be used for healing by an Ayurvedic practitioner. Several scientific studies have documented its great properties of healing like anti-bacterial, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal etc. and has been used successfully for hundreds of years.

 

Bibliography/References:

  1. Moringa, Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa.
  2. Moringa Tree, http://goodnewsaday.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/a-moringa-tree1.jpg.
  3. Trees for Life International, Moringa Tree. http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/Moringa.
  4. Janick, Jules, Robert E. Paull, The Encyclopedia of Fruit & Nuts. (CABI, 2008): 509-510.
  5. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Barbara Stadlmayr, U Ruth Charrondiere, et. al, West African Food Composition Table,   http://www.fao.org/docrep/015/i2698b/i2698b00.pdf
  6. Moringa Tree Foundation, Seeds of Hope, www.Moringatreefoundation.org 
  7. Trees for Life International, Moringa Tree. http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/Moringa
  8. Fuglie LJ, The Miracle Tree: Moringa oleifera: Natural Nutrition for the Tropics (Church World Service, Dakar 1999),   68.; revised in 2001 and published as The Miracle Tree: The Multiple Attributes of Moringa,  172
  9. All Things Moringa, H. Hiawatha Bey, www.allthingsmoringa.com
  10. Jed W. Fahey, S., “Moringa Oleifera: A Review of the Medical Evidence for Its Nutritional, Therapeutic, and Prophylactic Properties. Part 1.” (Vols. Copyright: ©2005 Jed W. Fahey. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Cancer Chemoprotection Center, 725 N. Wolfe Street, 406 WBSB, Baltimore, Maryland, USA 21205-2185.]
  11. Moringa Leaves, Angela Mays, http://angelamays.com/files/2012/10/Moringa-overz-Benefits-Leaves.jpg
  12. Mulugeta Tesemma, Legesse Adane, Yinebeb Tariku, Diriba Muleta and Shiferaw Demise. “Isolation of Compounds from Acetone Extract of Root Wood of Moringa stenopetala and Evaluation of their Antibacterial Activities” Research Journal of Medicinal Plant, 7(1) (2013):  32-47
  13. Debnath S, Biswas D, Ray K, Guha D., “Moringa oleifera induced potentiation of serotonin release by 5-HT(3) receptors in experimental ulcer model”,  Phytomedicine, 18(2-3) (2011-Jan-15):  91-95
  14. Debnath, S., & Guha, D., “Role of Moringa oleifera on enterochromaffin cell count and serotonin content of experimental ulcer model,” Indian Journal of Exp Biol, 45(8), (2007):   726-731.
  15. Pal, S., Mukherjee, P., Saha, K., M., P., & Saha, B. “Studies on some psychopharmacological actions of Moringa oleifera Lam.”, Phototherapy Research, 10(5), (1996):  402-405.
  16. Chumark, Khunawat et. al, “The in vitro and ex vivo antioxidant properties, hypolipidaemic and antiatherosclerotic activities of water extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves,” Journal of Ethno-Pharmocology 116(3) (2008 Mar 28):  439-446.
  17. Jain, Pankaj G. et al., “Hypolipidemic activity of Moringa oleifera Lam., Moringaceae, on high fat diet induced hyperlipidemia in albino rats,” Rev. bras. farmacogn., 20(6) (Dec 2010):  969-973.
  18. Chuang, P. H., Lee, C.W., Chou, J. Y., Murugan, M., Shieh, B.J., & Chen, H. M. “Anti-fungal activity of crude extracts and essential oil of Moringa oleifera Lam.”, Bioresour Technol, 98(1), (2007):  232-236.
  19. Karadi, R. V., Gadge, N. B., Alagawadi, K. R., & Savadi, R. V., “Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. root-wood on ethylene glycol induced urolithiasis in rats.” J Enthnopharmacol, 105(1-2), (2006): 306-311.
  20. Hamza AA, “Ameliorative effects of Moringa oleifera Lam seed extract on liver fibrosis in rats.”

Food Chem Toxicol. 48(1), (2010 Jan):  345-355.

  1. Bharali R, Tabassum J, Azad MR, “Chemomodulatory effect of Moringa oleifera, Lam, on hepatic carcinogen metabolising enzymes, antioxidant parameters and skin papillomagenesis in mice.”  Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 4(2) (2003 Apr-Jun): 131-139.
  2. Jaiswal D, Kumar Rai P, Kumar A, Mehta S, Watal G, “Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves aqueous extract therapy on hyperglycemic rats,” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 123(3) (2009 Jun 25): 392-396.
  3. Adhishakti LLC, Vaidya Mishra,  “Moringa Super Veggie”, http://issuu.com/vaidyamishra/docs/moringa_super_veggie
  4. Dr JV Hebbar, Moringa Benefits, Medicinal Usage and Complete Ayurveda Details, http://easyayurveda.com/2012/12/06/moringa-benefits-medicinal-usage-complete-ayurveda-details/ 
  5. Dr JV Hebbar, Easy Ayurveda, http://i0.wp.com/easyayurveda.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/shigru.jpg 

– See more at: http://www.ayurvedacollege.com/articles/students/MagicalMoringa#sthash.MlDPIpMU.dpuf

The Most Nutrient Plant On Earth

Apr 12, 16
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Free Moringa eBook Giveaway

You’ll Discover:

  • The diversity of this amazing plant
  • How it has the potential to change the world’s nutritional needs
  • Answer the malnutrition dilemma to change & save lives!
  • Where to find products & trees

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Moringa Used in Ancient Egypt

Apr 11, 16
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Moringa Amphora

ancient moringa
From the Tomb of Maiherpri:18th Dynasty

Jars, Vases & Bowls

This is especially significant, since the expensive oils which some of them held were usually among the first items to be stolen because they did not keep long. Some of the dockets attached to the jars indicated that they had contained b3k-oil, a very expensive commodity made from moringa nuts. The calcite vase seen on the far right below in this plate still contained about three quarts of rancid oil when it was discovered.

The oil from the Moringa Oleifera nut was used by the ancient Egyptians. This extremely fast growing woody species (Moringa oleifera, Moringaceae)  could open up a new category of crops: “vegetable trees.” It also produces masses of very small leaflets that are boiled and eaten like spinach. Being so small, the leaflets sun dry in just a few hours and can then be put in a jar and stored for the off-season, a time when dietary minerals and vitamins are often scarce. Moringa seeds could be employed to make water safer for drinking and cooking.

Maiherpri – King Moringa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Maiherpri ( Lion of the Battlefield )
in hieroglyphs

Papyrus of Maiherpri

Maiherperi was an Ancient Egyptian noble of Nubian origin buried in the Valley of the Kings, in tomb KV36. He probably lived during the rule of Thutmose IV, and received the honour of a burial in the Valley of the Kings, the royal necropolis. His name can be translated as Lion of the Battlefield,[1]. Amongst his titles were Child of the Nursery and Royal Fan-Bearer of the Right Hand Side. There is speculation that the first title signified that he grew up in the royal nursery as a prince of a vassal territory, or perhaps was the son of a lesser wife or concubine of the pharaoh.[2] He was among the first during the New Kingdom to hold the second title, and was literally true in that he was by the pharaoh’s side, likely as an advisor or bodyguard.[3] This same title was also used to denote the Viceroys of Kush later in the New Kingdom.[4]

Contents

Tomb of Maiherpri

In Maiherperi’s tomb, a papyrus was found depicting him with literally “blackish” skin, leading scholars to believe he was in fact Nubian or of Nubian descent.[5] The papyrus in question was the Book of the Dead, in the eyes of O’Connor and Cline “[c]ertainly the most famous and arguably the most beautiful” Book of the Dead.[6].

The mummy was unwrapped by Georges Daressy in March 1901,[7] revealing a mummy whose dark skin matched that depicted on his copy of the Book of the Dead, and thought that this was likely Maiherperi’s natural colour, unchanged by the mummification process.[8] He also had tightly curled, woolly hair, which turned out a wig that had been glued to his scalp.[9]

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Moringa grows in over 80 countries

Apr 11, 16
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Moringa [Ben/Behen], is known as the miracle tree – and with good reason.  It grows to a height of only 7 – 12 m and has a lifespan of a mere 20 years.  Though not as impressive in stature or longevity as the beloved baobab, it can more than hold its own in the impressive stakes.

Moringa has a short, but intense life, growing like the clappers.  It can grow up to 4 m in in a season – taking a mere 10 months from seed to tree!  As the maxim goes ‘Dynamite comes in small packets’ – and the mighty moringa sure validates this claim, and then some.

Naturally Healthy Moringa  now has stocks avaailable  from various suppliers like Zija International also :

  • Powdered leaves to add to soups, stews, juices and smoothies.
  • Tea for making herbal infusions.
  • Capsules for taking internally as a supplement.
  • High quality oil for massage and manufacture.

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Moringa grows in over 80 countries, is known by over 200 different common names, and is referenced in over 300 folk medicine remedies.  Also known as the Drumstick Tree, and Famine Tree, Moringa’s virtues have even been passionately extolled by Dr Oz on TV, and lauded in print in the National Geographic [Nov 2012] magazine.

ancient moringaMoringa is one of the most ancient oils known to humans and its healing properties, which have been documented by ancient cultures [Greeks, Romans, Egyptians], have stood the test of time – and still come out with flying colours to this day.

All parts of this revered tree, native to Africa and India, are used for their pharmacological and nutritional properties, hence the ‘Miracle tree’ appellation. Moringa’s leaves and seeds are full of health-giving nutrients and skin-loving fatty acids.  It is used in cooking, cosmetics, medicine and lubrication – and even has potential as a biofuel.

Along with the other unique African oils, Moringa has become the latest darling of the natural and commercial cosmetic industries, due to its remarkable skin-smoothing, radiance-boosting, decongesting, detoxifying, moisturising, conditioning and anti-ageing properties.

Moringa and stability

Moringa amphora

Moringa amphora

Besides its many other virtues, Moringa oil possesses exceptional oxidative stability, which may explain why the Egyptians placed vases of this oil in their tombs to assist them in the afterlife  – so chance is a good thing that Cleopatra knew all about this facet of Moringa’s impressive profile!

Here is a picture of the Moringa Amphora from the Tomb of Maiherpri * [his name can be translated as Lion of the Battlefield].  Some of the dockets attached to the jars indicated that they had contained b3k-oil, a very expensive commodity made from Moringa nuts.

* Maiherpri was an Ancient Egyptian noble of Nubian origin buried in the Valley of the Kings, in tomb KV36.  He probably lived during the rule of Thutmose IV, [the 8th Pharoah of the 18th dynasty of Egypt, who ruled in approximately the 14th century BC.

For the aromatic perfumers out there ..…..…

Did you know that Moringa oil was used for perfumery long before the advent of alcohol  distillation  and  other modern day diluent chemicals?

Distillation dates back to more or less the 4th century BC.

During these times aromatics were extracted by steeping plant material or splinters of fragrant wood in oil to extract the essential oils.  The macerated material would eventually be placed in cloth and wrung out until the last vestiges of aroma had been retrieved.  Alternatively the material was boiled with oil and water and the aromatic essential oil skimmed off.  Besides Moringa, other oils like balanos [from the seeds of the Balanites aegyptiaca tree], castor, linseed, olive, sesame, safflower and sometimes almond were used.

Traditional perfumers however held [and hold] Moringa oil in esteem for its exceptional fixative powers i.e. it can absorb and retain even the most elusive scents, locking the aromatic molecules into the oil.  Another one of the reasons for my enduring love affair with this divine oil.

There are reports of Moringa being used in cosmetic preparations as far back as 1400 BC, wherein an allegedly successful remedy to treat wrinkles consisted of: gum of frankincense wax; fresh Moringa oil and Cyprus grass [Cyperus alternifolius] – a grass-like marsh plant of the Cyperaceae [or sour grasses] family that is also used to make papyrus.  The mixture was ground finely, mixed with fermented plant juice, and applied daily.  Let me know if you try it and it works!

These days Moringa seed oil is in much demand for natural and luxury cosmetics because of its stability profile and resistance to rancidity, which is due to high levels of powerful antioxidants.

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How to Grow, Plant, Cultivate the Moringa Tree

Apr 09, 16
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What could be easier than walking into your yard, and gathering healthy leaves from your own grown Moringa plants to put on the table?

Grow plant moringa oleifera tree

The Moringa plant is a fast-growing, drought resistant tree that can reach up to 3 meters in its first year.

The Moringa tree is very easy to grow. Simply plant seeds or cuttings in a sunny spot. The moringa tree is a plant that grows mainly in semiarid, subtropical areas.

Moringa Tree, A Home Gardening SolutionTo Combat Malnutrition

Learn how to grow your own multivitamin and have a Moringa farmacy at your doorstep.  Grow Many Moringa’s in a Square Meter

The Moringa tree is very easy to grow. Simply plant seeds or cuttings in a sunny spot.

Moringa is a fast-growing, drought resistant tree. The moringa tree is a plant that grows mainly in semiarid, subtropical areas. Moringa can grow in dry, sandy or poor soils.

Get a little Moringa in your diet, you can plant and grow your own multivitamin!

plant grow cultivate moringa

Moringa A plant with multiple medicinal uses and benefits

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Easy Instructions

  1. Find a sunny place
  2. Make square holes in the ground 30 to 60 cm deep
  3. Fill the hole with loose ground
  4. Plant the seed 1 cm deep
  5. Give the ground some water but not too much, otherwise the seed may rotten.
  6. Within 1-2 weeks the Miracle springs out the ground! 🙂

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Expert

Moringa oleifera is believed to be native to sub-Himalayan tracts of northern India but is now found worldwide in the tropics and sub-tropics. It grows best in direct sunlight under 500 meters altitude. It tolerates a wide range of soil conditions, but prefers a neutral to slightly acidic (pH. 6.3-7.0), well-drained sandy or loamy soil. Minimum annual rainfall requirements are estimated at 250mm with maximum at over 3,000mm, but in waterlogged soil the roots have a tendency to rot. (In areas with heavy rainfall, trees can be planted on small hills to encourage water run-off). Presence of a long taproot makes it resistant to periods of drought. Trees can be easily grown from seed or from cuttings. Temperature ranges are 25-35 degrees Celsius (0-95 degrees Fahrenheit), but the tree will tolerate up to 48 degrees in the shade and it can survive a light frost.
plant moringaMoringa seeds have no dormancy period, so they can be planted as soon as they are mature and they will retain the ability to germinate for up to one year. Older seeds woll only have spotty germination. Moringa trees will flower and fruit annually and in some regions twice annually. During its first year, a Moringa tree will grow up to five meters in height and produce flowers and fruit. Left alone, the tree can eventually reach 12 meters in height with a trunk 30cm wide; however, the tree can be annually cut back to one meter from the ground. The tree will quickly recover and produce leaves and pods within easy reach. Within three years a tree will yield 400-600 pods annually and a mature tree can produce up to 1,600 pods. Copicing to the ground is also possible, and will produce a Moringa bush is no main new growth is selected, and the others eliminated.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – IN THE NURSERY

6871118_orig

Use poly bags with dimensions of about 18cm or 8″ in height and 12cm or 4-5″ in diameter. The soil mixture for the sacks should be light, i.e. 3 parts soil to 1 part sand. Plant two or three seeds in each sack, one to two centimeters deep. Keep moist but not too wet. Germination will occur within 5 to 12 days, depending on the age of the seed and pre-treatment method used. Remove extra seedlings, leaving one in each sack. Seedlings can be out-planted when they are 60-90cm high. When out-planting, cut a hole in the bottom of the sack big enough to allow the roots to emerge. Be sure to retain the soil around the roots of the seedling. To encourage rapid germination, one of three pre-seeding treatments can be employed:
1. Soak the seeds in water overnight before planting.
2. Crack the shells before planting.
3. Remove shells and plant kernels only.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – IN THE FIELD

If planting a large plot it is recommended to first plough the land. Prior to planting a seed or seedling, dig a planting pit about 50cm in depth and the same in width. This planting hole serves to loosen the soil and helps to retain moisten in the root zone, enabling the seedlings’ roots to develop rapidly. Compost or manure at the rate of 5kg per pit can be mixed with the fresh topsoil around the pit and used to fill the pit. Avoid using the soil taken out of the pit for this purpose: fresh topsoil contains beneficial microbes that can promote more effective root growth. The day before out planting, water the filled pits or wait until a good rain before out-planting seedlings. Fill in the hole before transplanting the seedling. In areas of heavy rainfall, the soil can be shaped in the form of a mound to encourage drainage. Do not water heavily for the first few days. If the seedlings fall over, tie them to stick 40cm high for support.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – DIRECT SEEDING

If water is available for irrigation (i.e., in a backyard garden), moringa trees can be seeded directly and grown anytime during the year. Prepare a planting pit first, water, and then fill in the pit with topsoil mixed with compost or manure before planting seeds. In a large field, trees can be seeded directly at the beginning of the wet season.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – GROWING MORINGA FROM CUTTINGS

Use hard wood, not green wood, for cuttings. Cuttings should be 45cm to 1.5m long and 10cm thick. Cuttings can be planted directly or planted in sacks in the nursery. When planting directly, plant the cuttings in light, sandy soil. Plant one-third of the length in the ground (i.e., if the cutting is 1.5m long, plant it 50cm deep). Do not over water; if the soil is too heavy or wet, the roots may rot. When the cuttings are planted in the nursery, the root system isslow to develop. Add phosphorus to the soil if possible to encourage root development. Cuttings planted in a nursery can be out-planted after 2 or 3 months.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – SPACING

For intensive Moringa production, plant the tree every 3 meters in rows 3 meters apart. To ensure sufficient sunlight and airflow, it is also recommendedto plant the trees in an east-west direction. When the trees are part of an alley-cropping system, there should be 10 meters between the rows. The area between trees should be kept free of weeds.

Trees are often spaced in a line one meter or less apart in order to create living fence posts. Trees are also planted to provide support for climbing crops such as pole beans, although only mature trees should be used for this purpose since the vine growth can choke off the young tree. Moringa trees can be planted in gardens; the tree’s root system does not compete with other crops for surface nutrients and the light shade provided by the tree will be beneficial to those vegetables which are less tolerant to direct sunlight. From the second year onwards, Moringa can be inter-cropped with maize, sunflower and other field crops. Sunflower is particularly recommended for helping to control weed growth.[1] However, Moringa trees are reported to be highly competitive with eggplant (Solanum melongena) and sweet corn (Zea mays) and can reduce their yields by up to 50%.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – PINCHING THE TERMINAL TIPS

When the seedlings reach a height of 60cm in the main field, pinch (trim) the terminal growing tip 10cm from the top. This can be done using fingers since the terminal growth is tender, devoid of bark fiber and brittle, and therefore easily broken. A shears or knife blade can also be used. Secondary branches will begin appearing on the main stem below the cut about a week later. When they reach a length of 20cm, cut these back to 10cm. Use a sharp blade and make a slanting cut. Tertiary branches will appear, and these are also to be pinched in the same manner. This pinching, done four times before the flowers appear (when the tree is about three months old), will encourage the tree to become bushy and produce many pods within easy reach. Pinching helps the tree develop a strong production frame for maximizing the yield. If the pinching is not done, the tree has a tendency to shoot up vertically and grow tall, like a mast, with sparse flowers and few fruits found only at the very top.

For annual Moringa types, directly following the end of the harvest, cut the tree’s main trunk to about 90cm from ground level. About two weeks later 15 to 20 sprouts will appear below the cut. Allow only 4-5 robust branches to grow and nib the remaining sprouts while they are young, before they grow long and harden. Continue the same pinching process as done with new seedlings so as to make the tree bushy. After the second crop, the trees can be removed and new seedlings planted for maximum productivity.

For perennial Moringa types, remove only the dead and worn out branches every year. Once in four or five years, cut the tree back to one meter from ground level and allow re-growth. Complete copicing is.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – WATERING

Moringa trees do not need much watering, which make them ideally suited for the climate of places such as Southern California. In very dry conditions, water regularly for the first two months and afterwards only when the tree is  obviously suffering. Moringa trees will flower and produce pods whenever there is sufficient water available.

If rainfall is continuous throughout the year, Moringa trees will have a nearly continuous yield. In arid conditions, flowering can be induced through irrigation.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – FERTILIZING

Moringa trees will generally grow well without adding very much fertilizer. Manure or compost can be mixed with the soil used to fill the planting pits. Phosphorus can be added to encourage root development and nitrogen will encourage leaf canopy growth. In some parts of India, 15cm-deep ring trenches are dug about 10cm from the trees during the rainy season and filled with green leaves, manure and ash. These trenches are then covered with soil.

This approach is said to promote higher pod yields. Research done in India has also showed that applications of 7.5kg farmyard manure and 0.37kg ammonium  sulfate per tree can increase pod yields threefold.[3]

Biodynamic composts yield the best results, with yield increases of of to 50% compared to ordinary composts.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – PESTS AND DISEASES

Moringa is resistant to most pests. In very water-logged conditions, Diplodia root rot can occur. In very wet conditions, seedlings can be planted in mounds so that excess water is drained off. Cattle, sheep, pigs and goats will eat Moringa seedlings, pods and leaves. Protect Moringa seedlings from livestock by installing a fence or by planting a living fence around the plantation. A living fence can be grown with Jatropha curcas, whose seeds also produce an oil good for soap-making. For mature trees, the lower branches can be cut off so that goats will not be able to reach the leaves and pods. Termites can be a problem, especially when cuttings are planted.

Among approaches recommended to protect seedlings from termite attack:

· Apply mulches of castor oil plant leaves, mahogany chips, tephrosia leaves or Persian lilac leaves around the base of the plants.

· Heap ashes around the base of seedlings.

· Dry and crush stems and leaves of lion’s ear or Mexican poppy and spread the dust around the base of plants.

In India, various caterpillars are reported to cause defoliation unless controlled by spraying. The budworm Noordia moringae and the scale insects Diaspidotus sp. and Ceroplastodes cajani are reportedly able to cause serious damage. Also mentioned as pests in India are Aphis craccibora, the borer Diaxenopsis apomecynoides and the fruit fly Gitonia sp. Elsewhere in the world, where Moringa is an introduced tree, local pests are less numerous.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – HARVESTING

When harvesting pods for human consumption, harvest when the pods are still young (about 1cm in diameter) and snap easily. Older pods develop a tough exterior, but the white seeds and flesh remain edible until the ripening process begins.

When producing seed for planting or for oil extraction, allow the pods to dry and turn brown on the tree. In some cases, it may be necessary to prop up a branch that holds many pods to prevent it breaking off. Harvest the pods before they split open and seeds fall to the ground. Seeds can be stored in well-ventilated sacks in dry, shady places.

For making leaf sauces, harvest seedlings, growing tips or young leaves. Older leaves must be stripped from the tough and wiry stems. These older leaves are more suited to making dried leaf powder since the stems are removed in the pounding and sifting process.

Adapted from Lowell J. Fuglie and K. V. Sreeja by Dr F. Annenber

Discover the many health benefits of Moringa

Suggested Cultural Practices for Moringa by M.C. Palada and L.C. Chang

Moringa is one of the world’s most useful plants. This fast-growing tree is grown throughout the tropics for human food, livestock forage, medicine, dye, and water purification. It is known by several names in different countries, but is popularly called the “drumstick tree” for its pods that are used by drummers and the “horseradish tree” for the flavor of its roots.

Moringa is one of the world’s most nutritious crops. Ounce for ounce, the leaves of moringa have more beta-carotene than carrots, more protein than peas, more vitamin C than oranges, more calcium than milk, more potassium than bananas, and more iron than spinach. Native to South Asia, this tree is becoming a vital source of nutrition in this region, where most of the world’s poor people live. The multiple uses of moringa have attracted the attention of researchers, development workers, and farmers.

The following suggested cultural practices were developed at AVRDC in the Taiwan lowlands. Growers may need to modify the practices to suit local soil, weather, pest, and disease conditions.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Climate and soil requirements

Moringa tolerates a wide range of environmental conditions. It grows best between 25 to 35oC, but will tolerate up to 48oC in the shade and can survive a light frost. The drought-tolerant tree grows well in areas receiving annual rainfall amounts that range from 250 to 1500 mm. Altitudes below 600 m are best for moringa, but this adaptable tree can grow in altitudes up to 1200 m in the tropics.

Moringa prefers a well-drained sandy loam or loam soil, but tolerates clay. It will not survive under prolonged flooding and poor drainage. Moringa tolerates a soil pH of 5.0–9.0.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Preparing the field

Moringa requires thorough land preparation and a well-prepared seedbed. At AVRDC, moringa is planted on 30-cm-high raised beds to facilitate drainage. Bed widths being tested at the Center vary from 60–200 cm.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Choosing a Moringa variety

Among moringa species, Moringa oleifera and Moringa stenopetala are most commonly grown. Moringa oleifera is most widely cultivated and the focus of this guide. Varieties within Moringa oleifera differ in growing habit, leaf, flower, and pod characteristics (Fig. 3). Numerous accessions are being evaluated at AVRDC for superior production and nutrition qualities. Currently we recommend growers to use locally adapted lines. Characteristics of superior types include wide and dark green leaves, long and tender pods, bushy habit, and rapid regeneration after trimming.

Moringa Planting methods

Moringa is planted either by direct seeding, transplanting, or using hard stem cuttings. Direct seeding is preferred when plenty of seed is available and labor is limited. Transplanting allows flexibility in field planting but requires extra labor and cost in raising seedlings. Stem cuttings are used when the availability of seed is limited but labor is plentiful.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Direct seeding

Sow two or three seeds per hill at a depth of 2 cm. Two weeks after germination, thin to the strongest seedling per hill.

For leaf, pod and seed production, space plants 3–5 m apart between rows and plants. If using raised beds, form beds with 2-m-wide tops, and space plants 3–5 m apart in a single row.

For production of leaves only, space plants 50 cm within rows spaced 1 m apart. If using raised beds, form beds with 60-cm-wide tops and space plants 1 m apart in a single row. For intensive production of leaves, space plants 10–20 cm within rows 30–50 cm apart.

Closer spacing allows harvest of young edible shoots every two to three weeks.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Transplanting

Transplanting moringa consists of two steps: seed- ling production and field planting. Seedlings can be grown in divided trays, individual pots, plastic bags, or seedbeds. Use of divided trays and individual containers is preferred because there is less damage to seedlings when they are transplanted.

A 50-cell tray with cells 3–4 cm wide and deep is suitable. Fill the tray with a potting mix that has good water-holding capacity and good drainage. Use peat moss, commercial potting soil, or a pot- ting mix prepared from soil, compost or rice hulls, and vermiculite or sand. AVRDC uses a mixture of 67% peat moss and 33% coarse vermiculite. If you use non-sterile components, sterilize the mix by autoclaving or baking at 150Grow seedlings under shade or in a screenhouse with 50% shade. Sow two or three seeds per cell. One week after germination, thin to the strongest seedling. Irrigate seedlings thoroughly every morning or as needed (moist, but not wet), using a fine mist sprinkler to avoid soil splash and plant damage. Transplant seedlings one month after sowing.

Pots or bags may be used to grow larger trans- plants. Fill the containers (0.5–1.0 kg by volume) with potting mix similar to that used in seedling trays. If potting mix is not available, use 3 parts soil to 1 part sand. Sow two or three seeds per pot or bag. One week after germination, thin to the strongest seedling. These plants are transplanted in the field after they reach 50 cm high.

If seedlings are started in a raised seedbed, the soil should be partially sterilized by burning a 3–5 cm layer of rice straw or other organic matter on the bed. The burned ash adds minor amounts of P and K to the soil. Sow two or three seeds in holes spaced 10 cm apart in furrows spaced 25 cm apart. Cover seedbed with a fine-mesh nylon net to protect seedlings from pests, heavy rain, and harsh sunlight. Transplant seedlings one month after sowing or when they reach 20–30 cm high. Dig seedlings using a trowel taking care that roots are not damaged. Place the bare-root seedlings in a bucket containing water and transplant them as soon as possible.

Field planting. Spacing’s are similar to those recommended in the direct seeding method.

Moringa may also be planted 1 m apart or closer in a row to establish living fence posts. Trees can be planted in gardens to provide shade to vegetables less tolerant to direct sunlight. Moringa trees are also used to support climbing crops such as yam and pole beans. Trees are also planted in hedgerows forming wide alleys where vegetables are planted within. Choose vegetables that are adapted to alley cropping, such as shade-tolerant leafy vegetables and herbs, since moringa hedgerows are highly competitive and can reduce yields of companion plants significantly.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Using stem cuttings

Compared to trees planted from seed, trees from stem cuttings grow faster but develop a shallow root system that makes them more susceptible to moisture stress and wind damage.

Make stem cuttings using branches of a tree that is at least one year old. Use hard wood and avoid using young green stem tissue. Cuttings can be 45–150 cm long with diameters of 4–16 cm. Cuttings can be dried in the shade for three days before planting in the nursery or in the field. Cut- tings are then planted directly or planted in plastic pots or bags in the nursery or screenhouse. When planting directly, plant cuttings in light, sandy soil. Plant one- third of the length in the soil (i.e., if the cutting is 90 cm long, plant it 30 cm deep). Add a balanced fertilizer or compost to infertile soils to en- courage root development. Irrigate regularly to keep the soil moist but not wet. Cuttings planted in a nursery are ready for field planting after 2– 3 months. Follow the field planting recommendations mentioned for direct seeding and transplanting.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Controlling pests and diseases

Fertilizing

Moringa grows well in most soils without additions of fertilizer. Once established, the extensive and deep root system of moringa is efficient in mining nutrients from the soil.

For optimum growth and yields, fertilizers are applied at planting time. Dig trenches around the base of the plant (10–20 cm from the base) and apply approximately 300 g of a commercial nitro- gen fertilizer per tree. If commercial nitrogen fertilizer is not available, use compost or well-rotted farmyard manure at the rate of 1–2 kg/tree.

Irrigating Moringa

Irrigate newly transplanted trees immediately after transplanting to promote early root development. In dry and arid climates, irrigate regularly for the first two months. Once established, moringa rarely need watering. The well-rooted tree tolerates drought and needs irrigation only when persistent wilting is evident.

Controlling weeds

Cultivate the soil thoroughly before planting to sup- press early weed growth. Apply straw and/or plastic mulch around the base of each young tree. Maintain a weed-free planting by regularly cultivating between beds and rows.

Moringa is resistant to most pests and diseases, but outbreaks may occur under certain conditions. For example, diplodia root rot may appear in waterlogged soils, causing severe wilting and death of plants. Mite populations can increase during dry and cool weather. These pests create yellowing of leaves, but plants usually recover during warm weather. Other insect pests include termites, aphids, leafminers, whiteflies, and caterpillars.

Chemical control of insect pests should be used only when severe infestations occur. Choose a pesticide that targets the specific pest causing the damage, and avoid pesticides that kill or inhibit the development of beneficial organisms. Choose pesticides that last only a few days.

Cattle, sheep, pigs, and goats will eat moringa seedlings, pods and leaves. Protect moringa seedlings from livestock by installing fence or by planting a hedge around the plot.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Pruning

Moringa should be trimmed to promote branching, increase yields, and facilitate harvesting. If left to grow without cutting the main trunk, the fast-growing tree will grow straight and tall producing leaves and pods only on the primary stem. To encourage the development of many branches and pods within easy reach from the ground, prune the apical growing shoot when the tree is 1.0–2.0 m high. Use a sharp cutting knife, machete, or pruning saw to make smooth cuts. New shoots will emerge from just below where the cut is made. Thereafter, cut the growing tips of the branches so that the tree will become bushier. Another pruning strategy is to cut back each branch by 30 cm when it reaches 60 cm in length. This will produce a multibranched shrub.

If the tree is being grown for pod production, remove flowers during the first year. This will channel all of the young tree’s energy into vegetative and root development (rather than energy- draining pods), leading to more vigorous growth and productive yields in the future, to making dried leaf powder, since stems can be removed during the sifting process.

For fresh vegetables, tie harvested leaves in bundles and place them under shade to maintain freshness. Moringa leaves can easily lose moisture after harvesting, therefore, harvest early in the morning and sell the same day, if possible.

The leaflets can also be dried in the sun for a few hours and then stored for consumption during the hot-wet season, a time when minerals and vitamins are most lacking in diets.

Flowers and pods are normally produced during the second year of growth. Harvest pods when they are young, tender, and green. They are eaten as green beans. Older pods are fibrous and develop a tough shell, but their pulp and immature seeds remain edible until shortly before the ripening process begins. Immature seeds can be used in recipes similar to green peas. Fresh or dried flowers are used for making teas.

Older trees that are unproductive or too high for easy harvesting can be pruned at ground level. New shoots will emerge quickly from the base.

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Harvesting

Leaves can be harvested after plants grow 1.5–2.0 m, which usually takes at least one year. Harvest leaves by snapping leaf stems from branches. Harvesting young shoot tips will promote development of side branches where cuts along the main branches are made. Allow plants to develop new shoots and branches before subsequent harvests. If plants are grown at closer spacing and higher density, cut plants about 10–20 cm above ground.

Older leaves will need to be stripped from their tough and wiry stems. These leaves are more suited

Moringa Plant, Grow, Cultivation – Collecting and storing ripe Moringa seeds

Mature pods contain ripe seeds that are used for planting the next crop or for extracting oil. When producing seed for oil extraction, allow the pods to dry and turn brown on the tree. Harvest pods be- fore they split open and fall to the ground. Store seeds in well-ventilated sacks in a cool, dry, and shaded area. Seeds remain viable for planting for two years.

Reference www.avrdc.org

Moringa is the source of incredible health benefits.

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Malunggay Succes Story – The Healthy Miracle Tree

Mar 18, 16
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Malunggay tree is know for its rich nutrients, proteins and vitamins such as vitamin A which is important for the development of eyes from growing children.

Another name is Mothers Best Friend.

The tree can be found in Asia, Africa and South America.

Products from the leaves and roots are vitamin capsules as food supplements, tea, shampoo, soap and can used for water purification purposes.

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Mar 16, 16
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